Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital SLR and Interchangeable Lens Cameras > Pentax / Samsung dSLR, K Mount Mirrorless

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Jun 8, 2011, 11:37 PM   #1
Senior Member
 
Monza76's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 4,095
Default They call them "Doodilik"

I really would like the proper name, here are a few shots from today, looks like a mating pair.
Attached Images
     
__________________
Ira
Riverview, NB, Canada
http://aicphotography.blogspot.com/
_______________________________
Current equipment
Pentax K5, K3:
FA 35mm f2, FA 50 f1.4, FA 28-70mm f4, FA 28-80mm f3.5-5.6, FA 80-320mm f4.5-5.6, F 50mm f1.7, Tamron SP 70-200mm f2.8 Di, DA 10-17 f3.5-4.5, DA 14 f2.8, DA 16-45mm f4, DA 18-55mm f3.5-5.6 WR, DA 50-200mm f4-5.6 WR, AF-540FGZ

Olympus E-P2, E-P5, OM-D E-M1: 9mm to 150mm lenses

_______________________________
Monza76 is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Jun 9, 2011, 2:04 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
penolta's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: California USA
Posts: 5,206
Default

Ira, these are Red-necked Phalaropes (Northern Phalaropes in older books). They breed on the Arctic and Subarctic tundra, and are only seen in the lower 48 as they pass through in migration, and we rarely see them in good breeding plumage, either. They winter at sea in the Southern Hemisphere. If you are far enough North (along the seacoast), you could also encounter Red Phalaropes, which have a much narrower breeding distribution They also winter at sea. They both feed on insects on the tundra, and plankton at sea.

From the swirls in the water around the bird in Nos 1 & 3, it looks like they may have been spinning - they do this to create a vortex that sweeps small organisms up to the surface where they can get them (likely mosquito and midge larvae here).
__________________
.
.
If life brings you lemons, you can make lemonade.

Last edited by penolta; Jun 9, 2011 at 2:11 PM.
penolta is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 9, 2011, 3:24 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
mtngal's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Frazier Park, CA
Posts: 16,056
Default

An interesting bird, thanks for the pictures, Ira, and the explanation, penolta. It constantly amazes me how many miles birds can fly during migration, especially smaller ones. These don't look like very big birds, to summer in the artic and then winter in the southern hemisphere. Amazing!
mtngal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 9, 2011, 5:17 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
penolta's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: California USA
Posts: 5,206
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Monza76 View Post
looks like a mating pair.
You are right - they are a pair - the male is the one with the white eyestripe. Phalaropes are unusual in that they exhibit what is called "reverse sexual dimorphism" - the female is larger and more colorful than the male, as it is the male that tends the nest, while the female philanders and may lay eggs is other male's nests as well! It is a method of ensuring the survival of their genes, should their own eggs or young be destroyed by any of the numerous predators, some of their offspring may still survive elsewhere. I believe some sandpipers that also nest on the open tundra do the same.
__________________
.
.
If life brings you lemons, you can make lemonade.
penolta is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 9, 2011, 7:30 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
Monza76's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 4,095
Default

Interesting. Penolta my first experience with them was when I looked out an saw this bird doing circles in a little pond, they spin very often. Harriet, they are not very large, probably about the size of a robin but with much longer legs.
__________________
Ira
Riverview, NB, Canada
http://aicphotography.blogspot.com/
_______________________________
Current equipment
Pentax K5, K3:
FA 35mm f2, FA 50 f1.4, FA 28-70mm f4, FA 28-80mm f3.5-5.6, FA 80-320mm f4.5-5.6, F 50mm f1.7, Tamron SP 70-200mm f2.8 Di, DA 10-17 f3.5-4.5, DA 14 f2.8, DA 16-45mm f4, DA 18-55mm f3.5-5.6 WR, DA 50-200mm f4-5.6 WR, AF-540FGZ

Olympus E-P2, E-P5, OM-D E-M1: 9mm to 150mm lenses

_______________________________
Monza76 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 9, 2011, 9:47 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: East Central Vermont
Posts: 1,890
Default

What fascinating birds. Thank you both Ira and Penolta for these photos and the amazing explanation. I am constantly amazed by the things I learn on this forum.
mtnman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 10, 2011, 9:35 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
mole's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 8,522
Default

Indeed some great photos, and fascinating information as well. Thanks to both the photographer and the educator!
mole is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 8:00 PM.