Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital SLR and Interchangeable Lens Cameras > Pentax / Samsung dSLR, K Mount Mirrorless

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Aug 8, 2011, 7:43 PM   #1
Senior Member
 
mole's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 8,522
Default Mostly Butterflies

Have been far from electronics for past week or so, and so unable to "stop by" here. Have far too many photos to post, but will try to control myself!

These hot, humid late-summer East Tennessee days are perfect for roaming the hills in search of butterflies and such. Many late-season blooms are rich with nectar these days, and become "butterfly magnets."

Here are two different species of Skippers enjoying Swamp Milkweed nectar:
Attached Images
  
mole is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Aug 8, 2011, 7:46 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
mole's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 8,522
Default

And several views of a Monarch working the Swamp Milkweed (which pose do you prefer?)
Attached Images
   
mole is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 8, 2011, 7:51 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
mole's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 8,522
Default

Even the Junebugs and Hummingbird Moths find sustenance in these milkweeds.
And of course the Milkweed Bugs are "hanging out" there too...
Attached Images
    
mole is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 8, 2011, 7:57 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
mole's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 8,522
Default

Teasel flowers are also full of butterflies these days. Our little Hummingbird Moth found some competition for teasel nectar from the Zebra Swallowtail and the Tiger Swallowtails...
Attached Images
    
mole is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 8, 2011, 8:02 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
mole's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 8,522
Default

Not all Tiger Swallowtails are tiger-colored! Sometimes the females are nearly black. These (along with Spicebush Swallowtails and Black Swallowtails) are mimicking the (very bad-tasting) Pipevine Swallowtails. Here's a dark female Tiger Swallowtail on a teasel bloom, and, for comparison, a Pipevine Swallowtail. We usually see the Pipevine Swallowtails only at higher elevations (where their host plant - dutchman's pipevine - grows), but this one was an unusual visitor - at a roadside near my (low elevation) home. (What do you think, does that old A 70-210 do a good job with the bigger butterflies?)
Attached Images
  
mole is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 8, 2011, 8:07 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
mole's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 8,522
Default

Of course, not all the butterflies are at the nectar sources. Here's a Common Buckeye taking a sip of "mineral water" on an old gravel road, a Carolina Satyr hiding in the tall field, and a PawPaw Sphinx Moth caterpillar having a fine leafy lunch...
Attached Images
    
mole is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 8, 2011, 8:11 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
mole's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 8,522
Default

There's plenty more to post, but this is probably about enough for one thread. Will start another thread with some more East Tennessee August bugs and scenes.

Hope you enjoyed these bright little late-summer insects, and will share your comments, critique & suggestions.

(PS - I will again be away from electronics for about a week or so, and unable to respond to your comments until later. Thanks in advance!!)
Attached Images
   
mole is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 8, 2011, 11:57 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
mtngal's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Frazier Park, CA
Posts: 16,056
Default

Your butterflies are always so inspiring! Yes, the A 70-210 sure does a good job on them.
mtngal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 10, 2011, 9:47 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: East Central Vermont
Posts: 1,890
Default

Ditto what Harriet said. I've never seen a zebra swallowtail; am I correct in assuming that they do now come up to northern New England? Knowing that the dark female tiger swallowtail and the Pipevine swallowtail are separate species, I can see the differences. But if I saw those two butterflies in the field, I would surely assume they were the same species!
mtnman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 11, 2011, 4:26 PM   #10
Senior Member
 
Goldwinger's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Winter Haven, Florida
Posts: 6,515
Default

Good job!
__________________
GW

Life's a breeze on a Goldwing...
Goldwinger is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 3:13 PM.