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Old Dec 17, 2011, 5:42 PM   #1
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Default Plenty of Fungus "Among Us"

Most fungi thrive on moisture and decaying plant materials. That's why late Autumn is an ideal time for fungus diversity.

Have been trying to document some of the varied fungal species here in the East Tennessee hills. Will work on identification later, but wanted to share a few of the more interesting varieties.

This is one of the many Amanita species - a few are edible, most are poisonous... (Taken with Tamron 90mm macro plus 2XTC) (Which perspective do you prefer?)
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Old Dec 17, 2011, 5:45 PM   #2
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Most mushrooms fit in one of two categories - under the cap are either gills or pores. Here's one of our most common pore fungi - the Turkeytail fungus (or it might be false Turkeytail, not sure), along with a yet-to-be identified gill fungus. (Taken with DA 35 macro)
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Old Dec 17, 2011, 5:48 PM   #3
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Another pore fungus - this is one of the shelf fungi. Tree fungi usually sprout from dying or dead trees. Remember that the visible part is typically only a tiny portion of the entire fungus - most is thread-like mycelium growing inside the fungus' "food." In this case, this dying Locust tree is home for a Squirrel and for a Locust shelf fungus. Some young school children told me it was the squirrel's patio! (Taken with Tamron Adaptall 70-210 plus 2X TC)
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Old Dec 17, 2011, 5:51 PM   #4
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And here's a tiny gill fungus growing from a pine log. The tree fell on one of our mountain bike trails (and was cut out of the way) about a year ago. To give you an idea of the size, notice the growth rings on the 2nd photo... (taken with DA 35 macro).
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Old Dec 17, 2011, 5:53 PM   #5
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This Oyster Fungus (maybe??) has sprouted at the same location on the same dying Elm tree for three years in a row. Both tree and fungus should last at least one more year. (taken with Vivitar 28mm close-focus)
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Old Dec 17, 2011, 5:56 PM   #6
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And here's another (as yet unidentified) gill fungus growing on a dying Tulip Poplar tree. One was taken with the DA 35 macro, other with Adaptall 70-210. Can you tell which is which (without checking exif)?
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Old Dec 17, 2011, 5:58 PM   #7
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Will only post one more fungus species, so as not to bore you too much. These were growing out of a very decayed stump up at Pond Mountain. Have no idea yet of the species, but Pond Mt is a great place for the rare and unusual...

If this winter continues as wet as it's started, we should have many more opportunities to study East Tennessee mushrooms in the coming months. Hope you enjoyed the fungus tour, and will share your comments & critique!
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Old Dec 17, 2011, 6:15 PM   #8
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Great fun, I love looking at mushrooms. We rarely get such interesting examples, usually ours (the few that grow around here) are just white blobs. Occasionally I'll see gill mushrooms pop up around the irrigated flower beds and lawns at work, but it's too dry around where I live. I always love looking at them - the gills are so delicate and most of the time they are such interesting shapes. That should tell you that I like the second of your first pair, there's a better look of the underside.

I could tell which of your two taken with the two different lenses (the next to last pair) was taken with the DA 35. They are both equally sharp, but the first one has slightly better exposure and contrast, looks more like a Pentax lens. That's not to take away from the other picture or lens - there are those who would prefer the look of the second one over the first. I'd be happy to own both lenses.
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Old Dec 17, 2011, 7:20 PM   #9
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Really cool Mole. I never thought of shooting mushrooms. Very interesting shots.
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Old Dec 17, 2011, 8:10 PM   #10
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Nature creating art at its best. Thanks.
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