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Old Feb 24, 2012, 10:53 AM   #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pboerger View Post
Dear Photo 5. Just don't do it. Your shot is not worth a kid's performance or heatlh. Period.
I actually LOL'd

I would say, don't shoot at full power, that would be a bit intense, however, run it to give the exposure you need. I would probably go for settings about 1.5 stops below ambient then pop the flash in for the correct exposure.

Looking forward to hearing how it goes.... and seeing some shots
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Old Feb 24, 2012, 12:12 PM   #32
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To repeat.

From NCAA Photography Rules: NCAA rules prohibit the use of on-camera flash in many types of varsity athletic events, particularly indoor sports.

From Using Flash for Indoor Sports Discussion: I can't imagine that you would be permitted to use a flash at a basketball game. It's a danger to the players.

From the Georgia High School Association Website: First, I would like to express the reason GHSA has created the flash photography rule. They have determined that the flash creates a distraction to the athletes, therefore is dangerous to the athletes that are competing.

From a College Cheerleading Contest Guidelines Manual: Spectators are allowed to take photos, but no flash-photography will be permitted, since it is dangerous for the athletes.

From Photo Tuts Hints and Tips for Sports Photography: The most important thing to remember is that the flash cannot be on your camera for most sports. The bright light flashed into the eyes of athletes is distracting and dangerous.

There is no reason why flash should be needed. With good technique and equipment, it just isn't necessary.
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Old Feb 24, 2012, 1:11 PM   #33
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Can anyone give a link to a case of someone actually suffering an injury due to the use of on-camera flash? Closest I've found is the case of golfer John Daly who claims that a flash interrupted his swing causing a back injury. He filed a claim against the tour organisers but I can't find any record of him winning it.

I think it really depends on where you are - NCAA rules for indoor volleyball say flash is only prohibited within 2m of the court. Outside that you're fine which makes sense. I guess the reasoning is that a flash from a reasonable distance is unlikely to be an issue unlike a flash within arms length which would temporarily blind which I can definitely see would be a problem. Imagine someone sprinting up the court suddenly losing their sight for a few seconds because your flash fired from 2ft as they passed you. It'd be like someone setting off the flash in your from the passenger seat while you were driving.
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Old Feb 24, 2012, 2:27 PM   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pboerger View Post
To repeat.

From NCAA Photography Rules: NCAA rules prohibit the use of on-camera flash in many types of varsity athletic events, particularly indoor sports.

From Using Flash for Indoor Sports Discussion: I can't imagine that you would be permitted to use a flash at a basketball game. It's a danger to the players.

From the Georgia High School Association Website: First, I would like to express the reason GHSA has created the flash photography rule. They have determined that the flash creates a distraction to the athletes, therefore is dangerous to the athletes that are competing.

From a College Cheerleading Contest Guidelines Manual: Spectators are allowed to take photos, but no flash-photography will be permitted, since it is dangerous for the athletes.

From Photo Tuts Hints and Tips for Sports Photography: The most important thing to remember is that the flash cannot be on your camera for most sports. The bright light flashed into the eyes of athletes is distracting and dangerous.

There is no reason why flash should be needed. With good technique and equipment, it just isn't necessary.
Not sure it is going to help posting something again as we could just go around in circles.

It is clear that there are some areas that don't allow flash as it is believed by them to be a problem, but there are many professional levels where it is allowed. With the society we live in now where people make legal claims for everything, if it was really dangerous don't you think it would be globally banned?

I heard it mentioned by one coach that if one of his players was distracted by a flash (or one of the many other things that happen during a game) then his player wasn't focused enough on doing his job.

Check this out for amazing moto-x photography with 8 x Nikon flash http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xNDAI...eature=related or this during a double backflip http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FYgWZHbhe30 where amazingly he didn't crash, so little Jonny isn't likely to have an issue with one flash.

It's fine to keep this conversation going but just arguing backwards and forwards isn't beneficial especially if nothing is added, and also we should remember that we've slipped away from what the OP asked a little.
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Old Feb 24, 2012, 2:30 PM   #35
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Quote:
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To repeat.
There is no reason why flash should be needed. With good technique and equipment, it just isn't necessary.
And, I'll repeat. besides quoting other sources, how 'bout putting your money where your advice is?

Where are YOUR nighttime football shots when it's complete dark?
Where are YOUR wrestling shots when faces are down-facing toward mat?
Where are YOUR basketball shots using f5.6 without flash?

You talk about technique replacing flash but we have yet to see any samples of YOUR technique.

Care to share YOUR samples from the above? As a photojournalist, you really should have plenty of examples to share with us. Right?
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