Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital SLR and Interchangeable Lens Cameras > Pentax / Samsung dSLR, K Mount Mirrorless

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Jul 22, 2012, 9:41 PM   #1
Senior Member
 
mole's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 8,522
Default Lilies of the Field (and forest)

Have been out checking on a number of our native East Tennessee Lilies lately, and enjoying many other late-season wildflowers along the way. Our recent rains have really helped bring out the blooms!

First a few test shots with a new (to me) lens. Got a Pentax M 135 F3.5 recently (quite inexpensive) and an Asahi Pentax Close-up lens. Was curious to see how this combination might work for wildflowers. Also very curious to hear your opinion on the results. Here are some views of a very common bloom of our summer fields - the Black Eyed Susan. Like all Composites, each "flower" is actually a bouquet of flowers - each of the petals, and each little spot in the center, is a separate small flower. (Not sure who Susan was, but she sure must have had beautiful eyes!)
Attached Images
  
mole is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Jul 22, 2012, 9:43 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
mole's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 8,522
Default

Another common Composite flower of the old fields, (and another test of the same lens combination), Chicory. Some folks still dig the roots and roast them as a substitute for, or an addition to, their coffee.
Attached Images
 
mole is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 22, 2012, 9:46 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
mole's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 8,522
Default

Tennessee's state wildflower also thrives in old-field habitats. Passionflower seems to do best in fields that have not been mowed for about 3 or 4 years. These amazing blooms were used by early missionaries to teach about Jesus' Passion, hence the common name. East Tennessee children call them "maypops," because it's so much fun to pop their fruits! (These also taken with the 135 plus close-up lens).
Attached Images
   
mole is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 22, 2012, 9:48 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
mole's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 8,522
Default

Our old fields and roadsides are also abloom with Thistle. Here's a test of the 135 on a small visitor to the thistle. We're looking forward to the ripe thistle seeds - a real "Goldfinch magnet!"
Attached Images
 
mole is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 22, 2012, 9:51 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
mole's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 8,522
Default

One more common, but fascinating old field plant - Common Mullein. It's a biennial: first year, just a circle of fuzzy leaves. Second year, tall spikes of flowers that become innumerable tiny seeds. Then the plant dies, but the seeds can last in the ground for many years, waiting for a disturbance. They won't sprout until they are buried for a while, and then exposed to sunlight. So Mullein plants are a good clue to recent land-use. (PS - this is the last of the 135mm test shots - taken without the close-up lens this time).
Attached Images
  
mole is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 22, 2012, 9:53 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
mole's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 8,522
Default

I did promise some lilies...

Gray's Lily is a very rare species, endemic to the southern Appalachians, and most common at Roan Mountain. This year's bloom was not as abundant as last year, and was a bit early. We almost missed seeing them! Here are a few samples of this native lily.
Attached Images
   
mole is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 22, 2012, 9:54 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
mole's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 8,522
Default

Depending on age, growing conditions, and probably many other factors, individual Gray's Lily plants may have no blooms, one bloom, or several blooms. Last year we found some with half a dozen!
Attached Images
   
mole is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 22, 2012, 9:58 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
mole's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 8,522
Default

Turk's Cap Lily is not nearly as rare as Gray's, but still not a common plant. Both species thrive in the mountains, but Turk's Cap prefers woodlands, and Gray's needs open balds. This seems to be an off-year for Turk's Cap here in East Tennessee, so we headed to the best local spot - Holston Mountain.
Attached Images
    
mole is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 22, 2012, 10:01 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
mole's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 8,522
Default

Like most beautiful blooms, these lilies are designed to be attractive - not to attract our eyes, but the eyes of pollinators! Here are several views of a Spicebush Swallowtail, enjoying the nectar and spreading the pollen.
Attached Images
   
mole is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 22, 2012, 10:04 PM   #10
Senior Member
 
mole's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 8,522
Default

The high elevation bog at nearby Flint Rock is the best place for a number of native orchids. The common, but lovely Yellow Fringed Orchid was in full bloom their recently.
Attached Images
   
mole is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:06 PM.