Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital SLR and Interchangeable Lens Cameras > Pentax / Samsung dSLR, K Mount Mirrorless

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Apr 3, 2013, 7:04 PM   #1
Senior Member
 
mole's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 8,522
Default Early Spring Blooms (& a few birds)

Spring is progressing a bit slower than usual here in East Tennessee, thanks to a few prolonged cool damp spells. Of course, that means that the early spring flowers are lasting longer than usual! So it's been a perfect time to get to know these spring ephemerals better.

It's also been a very busy season in the parks, so I am way behind on PP work. But wanted to share a few rather random spring snapshots...

First a few early-blooming shrubs: Spicebush and Leatherwood are both early-flowering shrubs of the forest edges. Look for spicebush in damp woods, and leatherwood in drier woodlands.
Attached Images
  
mole is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Apr 3, 2013, 7:06 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
mole's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 8,522
Default

Rue Anemone is often called "windflower" - its stems are so delicate that it dances in even the slightest breeze. Yet it's tough enough to bloom through the early frosts, and to survive in tiny cracks on the limestone rocks. Usually white, but sometimes a soft pink...
Attached Images
  
mole is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 3, 2013, 7:10 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
mole's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 8,522
Default

Here are two early spring wildflowers that are easy to confuse. Both bloom in moist old forests. Both have white flowers. Both have a very brief blooming season. But look closely, and you'll see several differences in the leaves and the floral parts. First is a Bloodroot (named for the red sap especially concentrated in the roots). Other is Twinleaf (named for the "siamese twin" looking leaves).
Attached Images
  
mole is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 3, 2013, 7:11 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
mole's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 8,522
Default

Here are a few more views of bloodroot at its (brief) peak of bloom. (Any preference among these views?)
Attached Images
   
mole is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 3, 2013, 7:12 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
mole's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 8,522
Default

And a Twinleaf with flower buds about to open...
Attached Images
 
mole is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 3, 2013, 7:14 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
kashka's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Minnedosa Manitoba
Posts: 1,158
Default

Beautiful!..I so do want to see blooms and buds as our spring up here is also very late..We are still under 3 ft of snow! My favorite is the last anemone..wonderful angle and that little drop of dew/water looks like it's balancing for it's life.
kashka is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 3, 2013, 7:17 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
mole's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 8,522
Default

We have several species of early-blooming native violets. Here's one of my favorites - round-leaf yellow violet. Those dark lines are like a directional sign for the bees - "enter here for fresh nectar."
Attached Images
 
mole is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 3, 2013, 7:21 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
mole's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 8,522
Default

Golden Ragwort is another bright yellow early flower. "Rag" refers to the ragged-looking leaves. We seem to have two distinct populations - on dry ridges and at creekbanks. Not sure if they are different species...
Attached Images
 
mole is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 3, 2013, 7:25 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
mole's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 8,522
Default

Abundant bloom is good news for the early insects. We are seeing a number of tiny bees and beeflies emerging. Some of the Mourning Cloak and Angle Wing butterflies overwintered as adults, and we're seeing some rather tattered individuals out sunning. But we are also seeing some newly-emerged butterflies. Here are two views of the aptly-named Spring Azure, licking Spring Beauty nectar (for the calories) and licking mud (for the minerals).
Attached Images
  
mole is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 3, 2013, 7:28 PM   #10
Senior Member
 
mole's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 8,522
Default

The home park is a great habitat for Swallows. Plenty of wetlands with plenty of tasty insects, and plenty of open space for wild swooping flights. Two species of Swallows have just recently returned to us from South America - first to arrive were the Tree Swallows, then Barn Swallows a few days later. Here are some quick snapshots - hoping for some better photos later...
Attached Images
  
mole is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 9:32 PM.