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Old Aug 13, 2013, 7:33 PM   #1
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Default Revisiting the Lilies

Posted a few photos several weeks ago of the Turk's Cap Lilies up at Firescald Knob. Well, the lilies on Holston Mt bloom a bit later, so I had another chance to enjoy these superb plants (Lilium superbum).
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Old Aug 13, 2013, 7:36 PM   #2
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Here too we noticed that plenty of Pipevine Swallowtails were visiting the lilies, and coating themselves with pollen in the process.
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Old Aug 13, 2013, 7:38 PM   #3
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It was interesting to notice that the Spicebush Swallowtails were also visiting the lilies. But, when a Zebra Swallowtail flew into the area, all the Pipevine & Spicebush Swallowtails chased it away! (PS - notice that the Spicebush Swallowtails have a double row of orange markings under the hindwing, and Pipevine Swallowtails have a single row...)
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Old Aug 13, 2013, 7:40 PM   #4
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When you look up from underneath, you'll see a green star in the center of each Turk's Cap Lily bloom.
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Old Aug 13, 2013, 7:44 PM   #5
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We spent some time in the Flint Mill area recently, looking for a close relative of Turk's Cap Lily called Carolina Lily (also known as Michaux's Lily - Lilum michauxii). Had noticed several plants in bud there some weeks ago that appeared to be Carolina (smaller in size, thicker leaves, fewer blooms than Turk's Cap). But the only way to be sure is that Carolina Lily does not have the green star in the bloom. We did find one in bloom (a bit faded already) at Flint Mill, but the two in bud have not bloomed yet! (Will have to return for some photos of fresher blooms...)
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Old Aug 13, 2013, 7:46 PM   #6
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How about a few blooms that are not lilies...

Took a hike up Unaka Mt recently, to search for my favorite non-native wildflower. Although Pink Turtlehead is not native here in East Tennessee, it's not at all invasive, and pretty much stays in the high, cool, wet places. That's a perfect description of Unaka Mt, and so it's a perfect spot to enjoy these blooms.
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Old Aug 13, 2013, 7:50 PM   #7
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And here's one more rather unusual bloom. Our Tennessee State Wildflower is the Passionflower (Passiflora incarnata - have posted far too many photos of this flower here already...) But it has a tiny cousin - Yellow Passionflower (Passiflora lutea). The yellow variety is a common vine at the edge of old pastures, just like its larger, showier cousin. But its tiny size means it's often ignored. Worth a closer look, don't you think?
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Old Aug 13, 2013, 7:51 PM   #8
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Sure do hope you enjoyed this second visit with the lilies! Thanks in advance for your comments & critique!
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Old Aug 14, 2013, 6:53 PM   #9
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Fantastic photos Mole. The yellow passionflower is indeed an interesting flower. But the bigger question in my mind is, what's the story behind the fungus that looks like coral in the next-to-last photo? That stuff has a fascinating appearance.
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Old Aug 15, 2013, 7:09 PM   #10
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MtnMan - I am definitely NOT a fungus expert, but I believe that this is one of the pink coral fungi. White species are pretty common here, but the pink ones are very scarce. The slimy stuff on it is snail trails - small forest snails have been gnawing the fungus in several spots.
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