Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital SLR and Interchangeable Lens Cameras > Pentax / Samsung dSLR, K Mount Mirrorless

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Sep 29, 2013, 7:28 PM   #1
Senior Member
 
mole's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 8,522
Default Early Autumn in the Wet Meadows

Here in East Tennessee, there's been a little nip in the air lately, and the daylight hours are noticeably shorter. Not much in the way of autumnal tints yet, but plenty of autumnal evidence in the fields and marshes.

Here's a meadow full of one of our brightest early autumn wildflowers. Goldenrod blooms at the same time as Ragweed. Both produce copious pollen. Goldenrod pollen is sticky - carried by insects. Ragweed's pollen travels in the wind, and is the cause of many allergic sneezes. But Goldenrod often gets the blame, because its blooms are so much more noticeable.
Attached Images
   
mole is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Sep 29, 2013, 7:31 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
mole's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 8,522
Default

Sticky goldenrod pollen is high protein food for many early autumn insects. This makes goldenrod a perfect place for Crab Spiders to hide, waiting for an insect snack. Crab Spiders can change color to match their flower - look how well this one blends in with the golden blooms of goldenrod!
Attached Images
  
mole is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 29, 2013, 7:33 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
mole's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 8,522
Default

Here's another typical early autumn bloom. Goldenrods grow in both wet and dry meadows, but the Great Lobelia only thrives where it can keep its "toes" wet. And they sure are a favorite end-of-season snack for the bumblebees!
Attached Images
 
mole is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 29, 2013, 7:36 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
mole's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 8,522
Default

Speaking of wet places, this was a banner year for our Great Blue Herons. LOTS of successful nesting and fledging at the local rookery. This brings lots of not-very shy immature Herons to the home park. We'll see how well they mature and survive the coming winter. (Perhaps that Black Vulture is waiting to see too!)
Attached Images
  
mole is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 29, 2013, 7:40 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
mole's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 8,522
Default

Here's another young'un. Black Rat Snakes usually lay their eggs in June, so hatching is usually in late August. These youngest Black Rat Snakes start of with complex patterns, and don't turn the typical black color until next year. Perhaps the patterning helps them blend in with the leaf litter? This one was hiding in the leaf pile on a recent especially cool morning...
Attached Images
  
mole is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 29, 2013, 7:43 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
mole's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 8,522
Default

And yet another autumnal "baby" from the wetlands. This little Green Frog spent the summer as a tadpole. He's still pretty new to legs and life on land! Was spotted by some sharp-eyed 3rd graders out on a school creek walk, and posed on a mossy fencepost for a brief photo session before returning to his habitat...

(PS - which pose/lighting do you prefer?)
Attached Images
    
mole is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 29, 2013, 7:46 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
mole's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 8,522
Default

We see several generations of Monarch butterflies here in East Tennessee. This is the last generation for this year. Their only food source - Milkweed - is quickly dying back and going to seed. Here's one Monarch caterpillar, about ready to pupate. They usually hang in a "J" formation just before pupation. Sure wish I had had the time to stay and watch the whole process...
Attached Images
  

Last edited by mole; Sep 29, 2013 at 7:47 PM. Reason: typo!
mole is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 29, 2013, 7:51 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
mole's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 8,522
Default

It's not too late for the Southern Spreadwings to lay eggs. These bright little Damselflies are most active here in the early autumn. Most damselflies lay their eggs directly into the water. But these spreadwings lay their eggs into plant stems. When the eggs hatch, the tiny nymphs will drop into the water. Great way to keep your eggs safe from most predators!

Can you see her sharp ovipositor penetrating the stems?
Attached Images
   
mole is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 29, 2013, 7:52 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
mole's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 8,522
Default

As for many dragonflies & damselflies, it's easy to tell males from females. Here's the male Southern Spreadwing, just "hanging out" near the egg-laying area - and "peeking out" at the nosy photographer...
Attached Images
  
mole is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Sep 29, 2013, 7:55 PM   #10
Senior Member
 
mole's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 8,522
Default

Have tried for several years to get a good shot at this species of dragonfly. Shadow Darners, as you might guess from the name, tend to stay in densely shaded areas. They also hardly ever perch. These are still not very good pictures, but the best I've gotten so far of these very brightly-patterned autumnal "bugs."
Attached Images
  
mole is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 9:38 AM.