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Old Dec 17, 2013, 6:55 PM   #1
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Default I think I attempted one of the most difficult first macro shots possible...

A quick swimming pet turtle! It's going to take some time to perfect my handheld technique with this lens and it's RAZOR THIN depth of field! Not a bad first attempt.


Untitled by CCampbell2, on Flickr
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Old Dec 18, 2013, 8:11 AM   #2
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Excellent photograph.

Up close and personal portrait of a Red Eared Slider Turtle.

You've caught the turtle's eyes very well.

Last edited by lesmore49; Dec 18, 2013 at 8:16 AM.
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Old Dec 18, 2013, 11:02 PM   #3
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Definitely not the easiest subject in the world! You did very well with this, especially considering the subject, it's an excellent first attempt. Anything that moves is tough, I suggest starting out photographing stationary objects, maybe flowers or pencils or screws or something else around the house that doesn't move.

While many tell you that macro requires a tripod, I don't completely agree with them. A tripod makes it much easier, but learning how to focus while leaning in and out (the best way to focus when the dof is so small) is a good skill to have. I find that AF can be a liability instead of an asset when it comes to macro.

If I get time tomorrow at lunch, I'll write up something about focus stacking - I played with 3 programs today and ended up purchasing one of them (one was CS6, which I already have). It was expensive (for me) but I think I'll get enough use out of it to justify the cost. I've used CS6's stacking capabilities enough to get very frustrated with them!

How big is your red eared slider? My local botanical gardens has a stream where they have something like 35 abandoned red-eared sliders that volunteers take care of. I know they can live a long time, I just don't know how their size relates to age - some of them are pretty big, not the quarter sized turtles you see in the pet stores.
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Old Dec 19, 2013, 7:03 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mtngal View Post
Definitely not the easiest subject in the world! You did very well with this, especially considering the subject, it's an excellent first attempt. Anything that moves is tough, I suggest starting out photographing stationary objects, maybe flowers or pencils or screws or something else around the house that doesn't move.

While many tell you that macro requires a tripod, I don't completely agree with them. A tripod makes it much easier, but learning how to focus while leaning in and out (the best way to focus when the dof is so small) is a good skill to have. I find that AF can be a liability instead of an asset when it comes to macro.

If I get time tomorrow at lunch, I'll write up something about focus stacking - I played with 3 programs today and ended up purchasing one of them (one was CS6, which I already have). It was expensive (for me) but I think I'll get enough use out of it to justify the cost. I've used CS6's stacking capabilities enough to get very frustrated with them!

How big is your red eared slider? My local botanical gardens has a stream where they have something like 35 abandoned red-eared sliders that volunteers take care of. I know they can live a long time, I just don't know how their size relates to age - some of them are pretty big, not the quarter sized turtles you see in the pet stores.
Thanks! I didn't have alot of good subjects when I got home to test the lens. It was already dark too, so his tank lights helped a bit. He just seemed more interesting than some of the other things lying around the house so I figured "What the hell...why not?". lol

We got him that size (roughly a bit larger than a quarter). He's now about 7 years old and I'd say about 5 inches in diameter. I've read that they tend to grow to the size of their environment with an eventual cap at what is considered "full size". So in a small tank, their growth will slow until moved to a larger tank. We're in the process of looking for a larger tank for him at the moment actually.
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