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Old May 15, 2014, 8:40 PM   #1
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Default Foggy Camp Creek

Enjoyed a recent hike up above Camp Creek in nearby Greene County. It's a great ridgeline hike, perhaps 5 or so miles, with several fine overlooks to watch the sunrise across the valleys. It's also home to many unique plants. Thick fog kept us from enjoying the sunrise, but made for perfect plant watching.
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Old May 15, 2014, 8:41 PM   #2
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Here's the "view" from Whiterock Cliffs.
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Old May 15, 2014, 8:41 PM   #3
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Mayapples here were not yet in bloom, but sure were abundant.
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Old May 15, 2014, 8:42 PM   #4
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This is a perfect spot for many trillium species. Most abundant was my favorite - the painted trillium (Trillium undulatum). Many of these were right along the trail (Appalachian Trail) - which prompted many interesting questions from the abundant through-hikers!
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Old May 15, 2014, 8:43 PM   #5
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Painted trillium was thriving in the higher, more exposed locations. Red trillium (Trillium erectum) was also abundant up high, but in more protected locations.
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Old May 15, 2014, 8:44 PM   #6
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There's a pale-flowered variety of red trillium too - same species, just a color variation.
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Old May 15, 2014, 8:46 PM   #7
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There were still several Trout Lilies and Wood Anemones in bloom up in the high meadows (those in the valleys have been done blooming for several weeks already)
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Old May 15, 2014, 8:47 PM   #8
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And this little Vernal Iris (Iris verna) was decorating a tiny crevice up high on Blackstack cliffs. This small native iris seems to favor drier and rockier locations than most other native irises.
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Old May 15, 2014, 8:47 PM   #9
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Speaking of high and dry, Lousewort also thrives in high, dry meadows and woodlands. That strange name is because of the belief that it could repel lice!
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Old May 15, 2014, 8:49 PM   #10
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And here's another high elevation plant with an odd name. It's a lovely little native viburnum called Witch Hobble (Viburnum lantanoides)! Now, I'm no witch, but it would indeed hobble me to try to run through a Witch Hobble thicket - because the branches bend, touch the ground and sprout more roots. This makes for a thicket of tripping hazards!
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