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Old Jun 11, 2014, 8:31 PM   #1
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Default Late Spring "Critters"

Thanks to a VERY busy beginning to summer season here in our Tennessee State Parks, I have not had the time to stop by here for almost a month. Also not much time to process the (far too many) photos from late spring through early summer. But here are a few samples of the "creepy crawlies" of May in the East Tennessee hills.

Little Wood Satyrs are an abundant late spring butterfly of the green meadows. They're small and shy, but sometimes pose long enough for a quick snapshot.
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Old Jun 11, 2014, 8:32 PM   #2
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Great Spangled Fritillaries are much bigger than the satyrs, but are also rather "flighty" and shy.
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Old Jun 11, 2014, 8:34 PM   #3
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Daisy Fleabanes are a late spring "butterfly magnet." Here are some Pearl Crescents working their "tasty" blooms.
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Old Jun 11, 2014, 8:35 PM   #4
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And here's the crescents' larger cousin, the Silvery Checkerspot.
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Old Jun 11, 2014, 8:36 PM   #5
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As spring heats up to summer, the native Odonates (dragonflies and damselflies) are emerging from their aquatic stage in good numbers. The pond shores are alive with Blue Dashers - dashing about after insect prey or after each other.
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Old Jun 11, 2014, 8:36 PM   #6
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Ashy Clubtails are also a rather early-emerging dragonfly. They spend a lot more time perching than dashing.
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Old Jun 11, 2014, 8:37 PM   #7
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Each 12-Spotted Skimmer seem to pick one favorite perch, and return to it again and again after each "skirmish" across the pond.
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Old Jun 11, 2014, 8:38 PM   #8
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One of our rarest dragonflies, the Cherokee Clubtail, has chosen a meadow and stream at the home park for one of its favorite haunts.
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Old Jun 11, 2014, 8:39 PM   #9
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Damselflies, the dragons' smaller, more delicate cousins, are also abundant these days. Here's a Fragile Forktail laying eggs and an Eastern Forktail resting after pursuing a tiny insect.
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Old Jun 11, 2014, 8:39 PM   #10
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And here's a Southern Spreadwing and an Aurora Damsel perching nearby.
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