Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital SLR and Interchangeable Lens Cameras > Pentax / Samsung dSLR, K Mount Mirrorless

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Jul 9, 2014, 6:50 PM   #1
Senior Member
 
mole's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 8,522
Default Butter & Moths

For some reason, it's been a rather poor year for butterflies and moths here in East Tennessee. Perhaps the unusually cold winter killed more pupae than usual? In any case, I've been working a bit harder than usual seeking out some of these "winged wonders" in the Northeast Tennessee hills.

Let's start with the moths. Here's a nice "surprise" moth. Io moths perch by day, close against a tree trunk, with their wings folded. Their forewings are fine camouflage. But, when startled, the moth moves the forewings to expose giant eye-spots on their hind wings. This gives the moth a moment to escape from the suddenly surprised potential predator.
Attached Images
  
mole is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Jul 9, 2014, 6:51 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
mole's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 8,522
Default

And another moth that really blends in... Luna Moths might stand out when out of their normal habitat. But look how well they disappear into the green summer forests...
Attached Images
   
mole is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 9, 2014, 6:52 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
mole's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 8,522
Default

How to tell moths from butterflies? Best method is to check antennas. Butterflies have a knob or a little hook at the end of their antennas. Moth antennas are either feathery or "stringy," but are not clubbed at the end. Most folks seeing this moth think it's a butterfly, or maybe a tiny hummingbird! But clearwing moths are indeed true moths. They are active by day, and they hover like hummingbirds. This one was enjoying some Basil Balm nectar.
Attached Images
   
mole is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 9, 2014, 6:53 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
mole's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 8,522
Default

This Silver-Spotted Skipper was also working the Basil Balm flowers. Notice the odd yellow objects on his feet....
Attached Images
  
mole is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 9, 2014, 6:54 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
mole's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 8,522
Default

Those are pollen packets, picked up at a nearby Milkweed flower.
Attached Images
 
mole is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 9, 2014, 6:55 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
mole's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 8,522
Default

Speaking of milkweed, here's a Great Spangled Fritillary working the abundant Common Milkweed flowers.
Attached Images
  
mole is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 9, 2014, 6:56 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
mole's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 8,522
Default

A Zebra Swallowtail working the same flowers...
Attached Images
 
mole is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 9, 2014, 6:57 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
mole's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 8,522
Default

And a female Tiger Swallowtail also busy at the Common Milkweeds. You can tell it's a "she," not "he," by the large area of blue on the hindwings.
Attached Images
 
mole is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 9, 2014, 6:59 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
mole's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 8,522
Default

This rather tattered male Tiger Swallowtail has found another member of the milkweed family - Butterflyweed, also called Butterfly Milkweed.
Attached Images
   
mole is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 9, 2014, 6:59 PM   #10
Senior Member
 
mole's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 8,522
Default

It looks like Pipevine Swallowtails also enjoy Butterflyweed.
Attached Images
 
mole is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 4:13 AM.