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Old May 9, 2016, 9:18 PM   #11
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Solomon's Seal thrives near Trout Lilies, but keeps its delicate greenish blooms well-hidden beneath the leaves.
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Old May 9, 2016, 9:19 PM   #12
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Cool, moist, gravelly stream banks are the best home for Virginia Bluebells. These were part of a population of nearly a thousand plants, all along one little East Tennessee stream.
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Old May 9, 2016, 9:20 PM   #13
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Speaking of gravel - our native Columbine thrives in the rockiest places. I had to hold on to the limestone bluffs by my "teeth and toenails" to get these shots!
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Old May 9, 2016, 9:21 PM   #14
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Limestone Bluffs are also the perfect home for Pink Azaleas. Unlike the ornamental garden varieties, our native Azaleas are deciduous. This one was not quite in bloom (that Beefly looks a little disappointed!)
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Old May 9, 2016, 9:22 PM   #15
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Perhaps he should have visited this flowering tree instead. Paw Paw blooms are the color of rotten meat, and are often pollinated by flies!
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Old May 9, 2016, 9:23 PM   #16
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But these blooms don't need any insect pollinators. Wind carries Red Maple pollen - insuring a good crop of "helicopter seeds."
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Old May 9, 2016, 9:23 PM   #17
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Here's another wind-pollinated tree. The tiny red flower is the female, the long yellow catkin is the male on this American Hazelnut branch.
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Old May 9, 2016, 9:24 PM   #18
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How about some more "flower-like" tree flowers? Here's a branch full of Flowering Dogwood blooms, and another branch full of Serviceberry blooms.
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Old May 9, 2016, 9:26 PM   #19
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Will end with two rather strange-looking blooms, and one non-flowering plant. Here is a Wild Ginger flower - low to the ground and sweet-smelling, it's pollinated by ants. And this Blue Cohosh's yellow flowers will ripen to blue fruit. No fruit on the Christmas Fern, but sure is fun to see the fiddleheads unroll!

Hope I've not bored you with too many floral photos - but this is just a small sample of all the flowers I've seen (and photographed) in recent weeks. Thanks for any comments & critique!
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