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Old May 30, 2016, 6:35 PM   #11
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Can you see the family resemblance between the Dog Hobble and the Fetterbush? When Black Bears are fleeing the hunting dogs, they are said to head to the dog hobble thickets. Their long legs let them get over the thicket, but the tangled bushes are supposed to hobble the dogs.
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Old May 30, 2016, 6:35 PM   #12
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As long as we're looking at some hobbles, here's one of our native viburnums called Witch Hobble. Plant these around your home and you'll be free of witches!
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Old May 30, 2016, 6:36 PM   #13
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Foam Flower and Miterwort are close relatives that both thrive in rich damp places. These were blooming over at Rocky Fork recently.
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Old May 30, 2016, 6:37 PM   #14
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Fairy Wand thrives on dry, steep forested slopes. It looks like a "cicada-fairy" used this wand!
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Old May 30, 2016, 6:38 PM   #15
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Fringed Polygala also thrives on slopes - usually very shaly slopes.
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Old May 30, 2016, 6:38 PM   #16
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Even the trees are blooming well these days. Take a look at this Fraser's Magnolia - that's some big flower!
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Old May 30, 2016, 6:39 PM   #17
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Blue-eyed Grass is a tiny, grass-like plant in the Iris family, with a tiny bright flower. They are abundant all over the forest edges these days.
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Old May 30, 2016, 6:40 PM   #18
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And Purple Wood Sorrel is also very abundant in the young woodlands. You may know its yellow-flowered cousin that grows in lawns. Both have clover-like leaves with a pleasant sour taste.
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Old May 30, 2016, 6:42 PM   #19
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Will close with one of my favorite strange flowers. You probably know a rather odd flower called Jack In The Pulpit. It has some even odder cousins. This one is called Green Dragon. If you seen Jack, you can see the family resemblance. Green Dragon blooms later and thrives in much wetter locations. The home park has the biggest population of these that I know of, and they were almost all blooming just a few days ago.
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Old May 30, 2016, 6:43 PM   #20
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This is just a small sampling of the amazing diversity of late Spring wildflowers here in East Tennessee. Hope you enjoyed them, and that you'll share your comments and suggestions.
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