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Old Nov 2, 2016, 9:22 PM   #1
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Default Fall "Bugs"

It's been a great autumn for many of our native insects. Here are a few samples from here at the home park and nearby.

Will start with a "bug" who isn't an insect - a Golden Garden Spider. Folks here often call them "writing spiders," because of the zig-zags in the web. Old story was, if you find your name written in a writing spider's web, you are going to die that day! Perhaps that grasshopper's name was "ZZZZZ!"
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Old Nov 2, 2016, 9:23 PM   #2
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Not sure of the species of spider, but he sure has a nice mouthful of Great Spreadwing! Great Spreadwings are among our last damselflies of the season.
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Old Nov 2, 2016, 9:24 PM   #3
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And Shadow Darners and Meadow Hawks are among our last dragonflies of the season.
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Old Nov 2, 2016, 9:25 PM   #4
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Here's another autumnal insect predator. This is the more common, but non-native mantis - the Praying Mantis.
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Old Nov 2, 2016, 9:26 PM   #5
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And now for an assortment of butterflies… Here's a Pipevine Swallowtail caterpillar on its host plant (Dutchman's Pipevine) up at Flint Rock, and an adult Pipevine Swallowtail butterfly enjoying some manure at Hampton Creek Cove.
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Old Nov 2, 2016, 9:27 PM   #6
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Here's one of the butterflies that mimic Pipevine Swallowtails. Spicebush Swallowtails look a lot like their cousins, but lack the toxic properties.
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Old Nov 2, 2016, 9:28 PM   #7
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And here's another pipevine mimic - some female Tiger Swallowtails look like pipevines, but again, are not toxic.
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Old Nov 2, 2016, 9:29 PM   #8
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This is a more typical color pattern for the Tiger Swallowtails. This one is working on some late-season Swamp Milkweed.
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Old Nov 2, 2016, 9:30 PM   #9
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Swamp Milkweed is also a favorite of Silvery Checkerspots.
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Old Nov 2, 2016, 9:30 PM   #10
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Now two species of Sulphur Butterflies - a Sleepy Orange at the home park...
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