Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital SLR and Interchangeable Lens Cameras > Pentax / Samsung dSLR, K Mount Mirrorless

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Jan 24, 2005, 2:16 PM   #1
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 6
Default

Hi all, newbie here

I have read from various tests and user review online that the *ist DS is slow(er) in focusing, compared to it's rivals.

I have had a quick play in the shop over the weekend and it does feel slower to lock on than the D70. If the D70 is any size near the ist DS i would have bought it, but it really is too bulky.

I travel a lot and portability of a camera is very important.

What's your experiences? Is it noticable? problem gets in the way while you taking pictures?

Also what's the likely cause of the slow focusing? Is it the focusing system's fault or the lens (slower motor than the D70?).

Focusing speed, under complex lighting situration is also very important to me, as I take a lot of pictures of fish (very fast moving object) in a marine coral aquarium environment, through the glass. The lighitng is usually Metal halide lighting of 150W, so moderate light.

Does any ist DS owners have coral tanks that they took pictures for?

Thanks very much in advance!

Katsura is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Jan 25, 2005, 1:55 AM   #2
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 72
Default

Well, I've had my *ist DS now since just before Christmas. I find that in some situations (low contrast subject), that the focus will take a second or two to lock, but 95% of the time, the focus is just fine. The Canon 20D is certainly faster (and bigger and $600 more), but I don't find the *ist DS to be slower than the Nikon D70by any noticeable amount.

Also if you put it in continuous focus mode (but putting the program mode set to "Moving Object Mode" - or what most people would call "Sports Mode") you'll see that the *ist DS can follow a moving subject and refocus quite quickly. It's too bad that you cannot select continuous focus mode separately from "Moving Object Mode".I think this is a flaw thatPentax should fix in the firmware - every Pentax *ist DS owner - please write to Pentax and request that they fix this - the *ist D did it, so it can't be that hard.


jaynlisa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 25, 2005, 11:31 AM   #3
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 33
Default

One thing to remember is that the DS and the D are slower to focus in low light situations. Under brighter conditions the speed difference between the DS and the D70 will be much less than what you saw in the store. You should choose based on the type of photos you usually take. If most of your work is indoors under low light the DS might not be the best choice, unless you are prepared to use MF in circumstances where the AF struggles.

Also remember the DS has AF assist only when the OB flash is raised. This will help the camera focus in low light.

Perry.
snagglepuss31 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 25, 2005, 12:17 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 250
Default

The DS doesn't have the little red light like on the old P&S? The flash has to fire to find the range in LL? Yikes?
Panzergnome is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 25, 2005, 4:27 PM   #5
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 33
Default

Panzergnome wrote:
Quote:
The DS doesn't have the little red light like on the old P&S? The flash has to fire to find the range in LL? Yikes?
Not exactly. The flash does not fire at full strength. It uses a low level series of "blinks" for the AF assist.
snagglepuss31 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 25, 2005, 11:35 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 250
Default

Thanks! I guess it works, even w/o the flash firing. Just out of interest, on these auto lenses, what would happen if someone were to thread an object on the end, say the weight of a teleconverter? Would mass of this size bee too much for the mechanism?
Panzergnome is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 26, 2005, 8:03 AM   #7
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 33
Default

Panzergnome wrote:
Quote:
Just out of interest, on these auto lenses, what would happen if someone were to thread an object on the end, say the weight of a teleconverter? Would mass of this size bee too much for the mechanism?
It would depend on the lens that you are making the attachment to. Some lens' have mounts that are metal and some cheaper lenses have plastic mounts. My *ist D dose not have a problem with my Sigma 170-500 and this is a fairly large, heavy and awkward lens, esp. when it is extended out to full zoom.

Of course if you want to use a teleconverter you would be much better off getting the type that fit between the lens and the body. These will give much higher quality (w/o vignetting) and not extend the lens that much.
snagglepuss31 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 26, 2005, 10:45 AM   #8
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 16
Default

Time to chime in...

When I played with the DS and the 20D in the store for my first hands-on comparo of these two cameras, the DS was 'subjectively' faster at focus and lock than the 20D. Since I was not timing it, I cannot objectively tell you by how much. Both were quick at fractions of a second.

The 20D had the 18-55 f3.5-5.6 cheap kit lens similar to the DS I looked at. My assumption at the time was that for the same basic lens speed, the DS seemed quicker and quieter. If the 20D that is being reviewed has a faster lens, then focus in low light will be much better.

As an aside, I used my DS over the last weekend taking pics of sleeping Boy Scouts at a campout in complete darkeness. The flash pulsed before the picture was snapped and the pics turned out great. I am very happy with my DS purchase.

Dan
dceggert is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 25, 2005, 7:21 PM   #9
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 72
Default

Quote:
One thing to remember is that the DS and the D are slower to focus in low light situations. Under brighter conditions the speed difference between the DS and the D70 will be much less than what you saw in the store. You should choose based on the type of photos you usually take. If most of your work is indoors under low light the DS might not be the best choice, unless you are prepared to use MF in circumstances where the AF struggles
Snagglepuss, I would have to disagree with your characterization here. I tested the *ist DS and the D70 extensively before buying the *ist DS. While I would agree that the DS is slower to focus in low light, so is the D70. I found that both got slower and had more trouble with low-light, low-contrast subjects (as do most cameras). I would not say that the D70 focuses faster in low-light compared to the *ist DS.


jaynlisa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 26, 2005, 2:30 AM   #10
Senior Member
 
errno_gmm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 518
Default

It makes sense that any AF system will be slower to focus in low light situations. The only real issue Ive had so far with the autofocus is trying to focus through thick bushes and plants - there is just so much there it cant make up its mind what to focus on - which can be solved by using only the single focal point in the settings. Either that or manual focus - its just a flick of a switch
errno_gmm is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:31 PM.