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Old Mar 5, 2005, 9:11 PM   #1
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I am wondering if any *istDS owners have found that not having ISO values lower than 200 is a problem for them?It seems odd to me that ISO 50 and ISO 100 aren't available on this camera...

Thanks!
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Old Mar 5, 2005, 9:33 PM   #2
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riata0103 wrote:
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I am wondering if any *istDS owners have found that not having ISO values lower than 200 is a problem for them?....
Intrigued at first by their major hype--then learning that fact--I crossed this camera off my wish-list forever and ever. Any decent camera has gotta have ISO 50. And then not to even have ISO 100?? It's a POS...

My Opinion Only,

F2Guy
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Old Mar 6, 2005, 6:49 AM   #3
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F2Guy wrote:
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Intrigued at first by their major hype--then learning that fact--I crossed this camera off my wish-list forever and ever. Any decent camera has gotta have ISO 50. And then not to even have ISO 100?? It's a POS...

My Opinion Only,

F2Guy
A DSLR model like the Pentax *istDS has a dramatically larger sensor compared to prosumer models. As a result, it has far lower noise at any given ISO speed (because the larger photosites for each pixel can gather more light, requiring less amplfication of the signal for equivalent ISO speed sensitivity.

It's noise at ISO 200 is going tobe about the same as ISO 50 on many non-DSLR models, and it's noise atISO 1600 is going to be about like noise at ISO 400 on most non-DSLR models.


Being able to shoot at much higher ISO speeds with lower noise is one ofthe big advantages of a DSLR, since this allows youto shootwith much faster shutter speeds to help prevent motion blur in conditions with less than optimal lighting.




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Old Mar 6, 2005, 7:38 AM   #4
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I agree with JimC (where do you find the time to research all of this?) ISO cannot be viewed as an absolute, sensor size and design are just as important. Unless you were planning on viewing all pictures at 100% on a computer screen all of the time, or you plan on making billboards, it is not likely you will notice much difference between ISO 50 and ISO 200 on any decent DSLR. All of the present crop of low cost DSLRs are excellent picture takers, some will argue that they are better than 35mm (which is probably true if you do not use premium grade film). Most people need to spend a little more time examining the features they want in a camera rather than the published numbers for megapixels and noise at this level.

Digicams have extreme differences in noise performance because of sensor size and processing issues but at the entry level DSLR level there are only two sensor sizes, the APS size used by most manufacturers and the 4/3 system used by Olympus. Yes there are different sensor designs as well (CCD, CMOS etc.) but this has minimal impact on image quality IN MOST CASES.

I guess what I am saying is, get the Pentax if it has the features you want, get something else if it better fits your intended use, then look at the prints you get. You will not be dissappointed.

Ira
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Old Mar 6, 2005, 9:35 AM   #5
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The only trouble you can get into (that I know of) is if they limit the fastest shutter speed. I have been in situations where I had to dial down the ISO on my 10D from 200 to 100 because I was maxing out the 1/4000 shutter speed. Just too darn bright that day (why I was still shooting is another matter!)

I don't know what the max shutter speed is on that camera, but if its high enough, and the ISO200 pictures look good enough don't worry about that it doesn't have ISO50 or 100.

Eric
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Old Mar 6, 2005, 9:59 AM   #6
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eric s wrote:
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The only trouble you can get into (that I know of) is if they limit the fastest shutter speed. I have been in situations where I had to dial down the ISO on my 10D from 200 to 100 because I was maxing out the 1/4000 shutter speed. Just too darn bright that day (why I was still shooting is another matter!)

I don't know what the max shutter speed is on that camera, but if its high enough, and the ISO200 pictures look good enough don't worry about that it doesn't have ISO50 or 100.
That's got to be pretty bright, unless you wanted to shoot with wider aperturesto get a shallower DOF.

In anyevent,a Neutral Density Filter (or a Polarizer, whichshould reduce light by about2 stops) could be used with a model like this Pentax,if you couldn't (or didn't want to) stop down the aperture any smaller.




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Old Mar 6, 2005, 10:34 PM   #7
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I hardly shoot below 400 ISO, just not versatile enough for weddings. I've been working with my D100 for nearly three years, which has the same Sony sensor as the *ist D/DS, as well as the same 200 ISO minimum. I never missed ISO 50-100, nothing a ND filter won't help with. ISO 200 on a DSLR is far cleaner than any smaller sensor at the same ISO rating.
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Old Mar 7, 2005, 1:21 AM   #8
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Also I read somewhere that there is "native" ISO sensitivity for any given sensor and everything else is "artificial" - i.e. amplified or dumped. According to this reading (gee! I do not remember where it was!) best performance from the sensor only can be achieved at "native" ISO settings; mild amplification is OK, but dumping decrease pix quality. Sony-made sensor (used in *istD, *istDS, D70, D100 and probably other cameras) has "native" sensitivity 200 ISO. From my experience at this ISO camera produce much less noise than any consumer camera with ISO 50. So I totally agree with others - if my camera produce excellent results even with ISO 400, why should I bother myself with semi-useless ISO 50? Do not forget, that majority of modern zoom lens quite slow - 3.5 at the best and therefore their usability at ISO 50 is quite limited
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Old Mar 7, 2005, 12:23 PM   #9
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I have a friend that has a Canon G5 that has ISO 50 and photo's taken with the G5 at ISO 50 pale in comparison to those taken with my istDS at ISO 200.

That said I normally use ISO 400 with my DS because I can't really see much difference between that and ISO 400 and 400 gives me just the edge I need for taking bird photos.

Tom
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Old Mar 8, 2005, 12:05 PM   #10
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Thank you for your responses. I didn't realize how much of a difference the sensor makes. Thank you for explaining it to me. By the way, I purchased the *istDS yesterday and have been enjoying it immensely.
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