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Old Jul 23, 2005, 8:50 AM   #1
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Alright, last night I wrote out a long post describing the problem and what I did to rectify it but for some reason it didn't go through. So I'm trying here one more time. Just this week I bought an *istDS but on closeupshots the pictures are turning out too dark, instead of the nice, vibrant white I would expect. See attached for the crappy results. The results I'm looking for are more like this.

http://www.plateshack.com/y2k/Ontario/on02.jpg

I've tried all of the menu settings and have read through the manual to try and fix this problem and I can't seem to do it. Anyone else having this problem? Anyone reading this who can help me?
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Old Jul 23, 2005, 11:42 AM   #2
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1: Step back and use a tele zoom so light can come in from the side.

2: Remove the lens hood so flash can make it the the plate.
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Old Jul 23, 2005, 12:13 PM   #3
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Every camera's auto-exposure-meter is designed to average out to a medium-gray total. Of COURSE any camera of any brand is going to give you the exact same result. Look in your camera's manual and see how to adjust the exposure manually. For the *ist DS it's called "EV-Compensation", and it's on page 141.
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Old Jul 23, 2005, 12:13 PM   #4
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Every camera's auto-exposure-meter is designed to average out to a medium-gray total. Of COURSE any camera of any brand is going to give you the exact same result. Look in your camera's manual and see how to adjust the exposure manually. For the *ist DS it's called "EV-Compensation", and it's on page 141.
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Old Jul 23, 2005, 12:35 PM   #5
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The image editor you used to downsize the photo stripped out the EXIF, so I can't see the settings used for this photo.

What metering did you use for it? If you left it on Spot Metering, it may have metered on thelighter portion of the plate, ignoring the rest.

Also (as already mentioned), even with another metering method, EV compensation may be needed for some subjects.


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Old Jul 23, 2005, 12:40 PM   #6
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Mine has a habit of shooting really dark on an old kit lens, too. And not just in shots where it's trying to moderate the exposure.

In any case, use the procedures outlined above. If you wanted, you could expose it enough to make the entireexposure white .... So there's the correct exposure somewhere in-between.

And I actually learned something :idea:- that WB (White Balance) has a lot to do with the quaility of the photo!!!!! Match it (on your Fn menu) to the light source. (Perhaps you already know this!!!)
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Old Jul 23, 2005, 6:58 PM   #7
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Thanks for all the responses! PapaTonyinSD had the right answer. EV Compensation fixed the problem for the license plate closeups, but produced over-exposed views for the scenic/action type shots I sometimes take. I appreciate everyone who took the time to offercomments.
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