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Old Apr 12, 2006, 11:47 AM   #1
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I have a question and am not able to come up with the answer. The average RAW file is about 10mb. When you run it through a raw processor and save it as a full sizeTIFF, it is about 35 mb's. How does it gain so much in mb size and stay about the same in pixel size? I am using RSE, but it is the same in Pentax Photo Lab if you save as a large 16 bit Tiff. This is a good reason to delete your tiff's after you convert to jpeg- Bruce
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Old Apr 12, 2006, 1:11 PM   #2
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The *ist digital cameras have about 6 million pixels (so far!). Of those, 3 million are green, 1.5 million are red, and 1.5 million are blue. That's what you get with the raw file. When you make a tiff, the data is interpolated so you have 6 million pixels of each of the 3 colors.
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Old Apr 12, 2006, 2:31 PM   #3
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Thanks Ron - I knew it was something simple like that, but I didn't think of interpolating. I have a Fuji F602Z and it is a 3 mp camera that interpolates to 6 mp, but it is not the same as a true 6mp. I assume in the case of a raw file you do not lose any information doing this, that is until you change it to a jpeg - Bruce
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