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Old Jun 24, 2006, 3:09 PM   #1
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Every year as Spring ends and Summers starts here in the desert country of Eastern Washington, a special wildflower makes its final burst of energy. I always look at the Mariposa Lilyas the end of the Spring bloom. I can only say, what a way to go out. I took the picture this morning and with the temperatures predicted to reach 100 in the next couple of days, they won't last long, but I will enjoy them while I can.

The picture was taken with an old M42 Super Takumar28mm f3.5 lens, set at f11 on 320th. I did use a #3 close up lens also. As you can see these old screw mount Takumars still have it, whatever it is, enjoy - Bruce

I added one more of a Foothill Daisy, taken today also at the same place.





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Old Jun 24, 2006, 3:14 PM   #2
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Nice lens, tack sharp photo, wonderful flower. If you have a wild flower book covering your local area, could you please look up the scientific (latin) name? I'd love to learn more about this flower!

Kjell

Edit: No need, already found it myself. Calochortus macrocarpus.
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Old Jun 24, 2006, 3:20 PM   #3
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very nice and i did not know that wash. had deserts..

roy
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Old Jun 24, 2006, 4:07 PM   #4
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Roy - I added one more of a Foothills Daisy. Actually most of Eastern Washington, once you get down from the Cascade mountains is quite dry and mostly sagebrush and basalt rock. The rock is from all the volcanic eruptions we have had for 1000's of years. And you thought we only had Mt St Helens. Don't want to go through that again. The first settlers found this land to be fertile and full of bunch grass for there cattle. Of course since then we have massive irrigation projects that turned this into a green farmland. But if you look in the non-irrigated dry places, the wildflowers still grow as they have for thousands of years. Of course the cheat grass and other intruduced speciesare gradually takingthere toll and smothering the native wildflowers.

Billy - The Foothills Daisy is Erigeron Corymbosus, at least I think I have that right - Bruce
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Old Jun 24, 2006, 5:59 PM   #5
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bper wrote:
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Of course the cheat grass and other intruduced speciesare gradually takingthere toll and smothering the native wildflowers.

Billy - The Foothills Daisy is Erigeron Corymbosus, at least I think I have that right - Bruce
understood. i was on the airport shuttle in Phoenix once and a gal was complaining about allergies, how bad they were there. another gal said ''well, phoenix, use to be great for allergy sufferers, until everyone moved here and brought their favorite plant''. guess it's about the same..

roy
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Old Jun 24, 2006, 11:47 PM   #6
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They are lovely flowers, and glad we aren't the only ones suffering in the heat this weekend. It's still too hot to go to bed!
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Old Jun 25, 2006, 10:17 AM   #7
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That first flower is magnificent. wow
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Old Jun 25, 2006, 2:53 PM   #8
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We are predicted to have 108 degrees by Tuesday here , so I expect this will be the last weekend for the Mariposa's. The hot sun will take its toll fast. I went out again this morning and will share one more pic. The tree looking trunk on the left is actually Sagebrush and the Mariposa often grows right in the middle of the sagebrush clump thus helping protect it a little. All I can say is enjoy, between the wind and sun they don't last very long - Bruce

I know some of you may be curious, I shot the pic in raw and processed it to a tiffusing Silkpix. Converted it to jpg using Irfanview.



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Old Jun 25, 2006, 3:11 PM   #9
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No matter what software and pp you used – the flower as well as the picture are simply WOW!

Kjell
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Old Jun 25, 2006, 3:29 PM   #10
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whatever, it's still a unique looking flower. i don't think you said how big it is..

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