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Old Jul 9, 2006, 7:24 PM   #21
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I love your series of pict and memory part of your country and/or your childhood . My home country is Hong Kong and the bad part is that the good memory (bldg or landmarks) have been dismantled and replaced with skyscrappers. Let me say very few of the new buildings are under 30 floor high.
Keep up with the good work by posting.

Daniel



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My childhood town is also part of history. The town itself has the charm of a small town, they have kept the wooden houses even in the city centre. Well, city is perhaps exaggerating a bit, the town has a population of 12 000.
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Old Jul 9, 2006, 7:44 PM   #22
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I am once again in awe of both of your talent for photographing what you find, and jealous of having such wonderful spots to photograph. These photos are why I love coming here and checking out this forum. All this is giving me itchy feet, and we don't have a vacation planned until August/September (sigh).
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Old Jul 10, 2006, 3:58 AM   #23
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mtngal wrote:
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I am once again in awe of both of your talent for photographing what you find, and jealous of having such wonderful spots to photograph.
Thanks, Harriet. It's not always what's there, it can also be a question of a selective perspective. Have a look at this. Brahehus ruin, built 1640 and destroyed in a fire 1730.

A ruin, a wife and a son.
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Old Jul 10, 2006, 3:59 AM   #24
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And a few steps back. The highway isn't as old as the ruin, neither as beautiful IMHO.
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Old Jul 10, 2006, 8:16 AM   #25
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It really is always amazing to me how framing and composition can make or break a picture (or at least say different things). I love your first one - the interesting shape of the ruins and the family touch. The second one sets the ruins in a location better, but I prefer the first one.

I find composition much harder to sort out than the technical aspects. I can (usually) get a picture in focus with the right exposure (the Pentax cameras make that pretty easy), but my photos just miss being really good (sigh). Of course, that's why the pros get real money for their work - if it was easy everyone would be doing it and no one would make any money at it.

When you are taking pictures - do you take both the ones that you are sure are going to be "wow" compositions (like your first one) and then others that are low-percentage types of shots? Do you experiment with the "I wonder if..." types of things?
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Old Jul 10, 2006, 10:34 AM   #26
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I love the delete button!

I just read about the guy who made a film about penguins. The film was a success, and an editor wanted him to make a follow-up book. So they paid him to go back to the Falkland Islands and the Antarctis and take more still photos. He took 100 000 exposures, 128 of them was good enough for the book. Digital give us all the opportunity to take thousands of pictures and select four of them to hang on the wall.

Kjell
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Old Jul 10, 2006, 11:28 AM   #27
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Kjell-

Selecting your photos carefully is a very important point. Take as many photos as you like. However, the key to an outstanding photo is in selecting the "perfect" photo. Great shots, Kjell.

MT
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