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Old Jul 30, 2006, 4:30 PM   #1
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I've had some good luck taking pictures with this camera, but I'm often disappointed with the focus on my pictures. The problem usually is that the autofocus latches onto something besides the main subject when I'm shooting a picture in a hurry.

I wonder if anyone has any tips for me. Which focusing option should I use, for example, wide or spot?What should I keep in mind as I take pictures, especially those where I don't have a lot of time to think.

Thanks,

Mike
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Old Jul 30, 2006, 4:42 PM   #2
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I set the focusing system to centre only which works fairly well. Sometimes, in low light, I set the autofocus to activate with the OK button, this prevent hunting for focus when I am trying to get the pictures.

Ira
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Old Aug 1, 2006, 3:04 AM   #3
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Ira:
Could you explain your techinque on this please.

Thanks
Jon
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Old Aug 1, 2006, 7:14 AM   #4
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Consider the effect of Depth Of Field (DOF).

I reportage situations I sometines use the apeture priority mode and wind up the ISO to ensure a good DOF so that the focusing point is not so critical.


I don't use spot focusing in this mode as somtimes teh centre spot is not where the subjects are.

I got caught once with an image oif two people and the centre spot auto focus settlerd on something between them puting the main interest out of focus.

Where I have more time to compose and prepare I do tend to prefer the centre spot.

Somtimes in those hurried situations I get camera shake that produces fuzzy images. So just check if all the image is blurred or the clear in focus area is not where the subject is.

Phil


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Old Aug 1, 2006, 7:34 AM   #5
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well you learn something new every day

i just read the manual (i have only had the camera 12 months)
and found the OK button focus thing
in the custom menu (page 101)
ok button when shooting (page 120)
i am going to give this a go and see how it works

thanks Ira

it only works with quick shift focus lenses apparently
what ever they are :?
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Old Aug 2, 2006, 1:40 PM   #6
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Jabilson007,

My "technique" is simple. First I set the camera (mine is a DL) to spot focusing so that only the central focus point is active (a menu item). Then I set the custom function to activate the autofocus with the OK button and not the shutter release. Now I can focus on the point I want by pressing the OK button and it will not require me to hold the shutter release to hold focus (I often find that the @#%$ thing will refocus on me even though I was holding the release down). This is a great way to prefocus on a specific area as well since it doesn't disengage the AF and you can refocus by just pressing the OK button.

I used this on Saturday to pre-focus on a specific church pew at a wedding. I was using a Non TTL automatic flash which required the lens set at f11 so the DOF covered any additional movement as the bride and her father walked into the "zone" I had focused on. The result was instant response from the camera with no AF delay (a phenomenon which has cost me many pictures in the past ten years), and sharp pictures. I do not set up the camera this way normally, but there are places where it is very effective.

Gumnut ????

The focus option I set on my DL works with all AF lenses. I do not touch the focus ring, when I press the OK button the lens will auto-focus I can then recompose and shoot with no further hassle. The quick shift focus lenses include all of the DA lenses I believe and some of the FA* lenses. I believe the warning is for people who try to manually focus the lens while in this mode, this would damage the AF motor, just as it would if you turn the focus ring when set in normal AF mode. Ignore the warning but heed this one, treat the lens as you would any AF lens when the camera is in AF mode.


Ira

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Old Aug 2, 2006, 3:52 PM   #7
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This is a great tip Ira. I somehow missed it also in the manual. I use to have my Fuji F602Z set for manual focus, so you pushed a button on the side when you wanted to focus. It became second nature after awhile and saved the constant hunting for focus as you move the camera a bit looking for just the right composurer. Again, good tip, thanks - Bruce
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Old Aug 2, 2006, 7:10 PM   #8
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Ira:Great tip and thanks for the explanation. One question though, do you have to hold the OK button when you take the picture or do you press and release the OK button?ThanksJon
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Old Aug 2, 2006, 10:46 PM   #9
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Jon, just press and it will focus, then release, as long as the distance doesn't change you can shoot away, no need to hold the button. The problem with the normal focus mode is that if you move your finger from the shutter release it will then have to refocus in order to take the picture. With the OK button you focus and then you don't have to hold anything until you shoot.

There is one serious disadvantage however, if you forget to push the OK button at all your pictures will be out of focus because the shutter release no longer controls focus (nor does it wait for correct focus to shoot).

I do not use this method all of the time but it is certainly becoming more common for me to choose this method.

Ira
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Old Aug 3, 2006, 1:59 AM   #10
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I am having a lot of trouble getting a really sharp focus using non AF lenses on my *ist DS.



I read the manual and set it to allow the manual setting of aperture.

I set it to Av

MF Manual focus

Compose and turn the focus ring while holding the shutter button on first pressure, when I hear the beep I press further.

Am I doing something wrong?

Perhaps I am revealing my in-experience here but are there any real differences that distinguish the results of poor focus from camera shake?



Thanks








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