Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital SLR and Interchangeable Lens Cameras > Pentax / Samsung dSLR, K Mount Mirrorless

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Aug 1, 2006, 8:35 AM   #11
Senior Member
 
NonEntity1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Lake Placid Florida USA
Posts: 2,689
Default

Thank you.
NonEntity1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 1, 2006, 6:28 PM   #12
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 52
Default

So how does one actually meter with a KA lens? Set it to the "A" position? (I'm guessing)

And haw about if one had a "K" mount that didn't have the AE function? I would imagine that you'd set the shutter speed on the camera and then rotate the aperture ring until...something...displays in the viewfinder? What might that something be?

Third question: If you have the "standard" zoom lens that accompanies this camera body, how does one adjust the aperture? (And is there a means for metering to occur other than "stopped-down" or just reading the display and setting things manually?)

Obviously, I have no experience with a DSLR although I did own a number of Minolta SRT 35mm SLRs in the 70's. I'm a big fan of the "match up the needles and shoot" school.

Any info, opinions, comments are welcome!

Thanks,
Barry

TDN wrote:
Quote:
Yes it is. With Pentax you're probably even at the best adress for that.
Even with really old lenses without any electronic coupling you can use the metering in your camera.
Of course things like automatic aperture, autofocus, etc are up to the lens.

If you're interested in buying older lenses I'd suggest you look for KA mount lenses. They'll give you everything except autofocus.

All AF lenses work on the digital SLR of course.

TDN
themacguy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 1, 2006, 7:04 PM   #13
TDN
Senior Member
 
TDN's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 1,288
Default

Yes, your lens need to be set on the "A" position on the aperture ring.

A KA lens will give you everything the kit lens has, except the autofocus.

This means you can use it in all modes on your camera, including Program, Aperture priority, Shutter Priority and of course Manual.

What I mostly do is set it to Shutter Priority, and let the camera decide on the aperture.

With older lenses it depends. I've heard that some lenses require "stop down metering", I'm not sure which ones though. I'm sure someone else with more experience will jump on this soon

TDN
TDN is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 1, 2006, 9:45 PM   #14
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 52
Default

TDN,

Thanks very much for your comments. I'm getting the picture (no pun intended).
themacguy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 1, 2006, 11:33 PM   #15
Senior Member
 
mtngal's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Frazier Park, CA
Posts: 16,056
Default

I often use K lenses (well, M lenses, but they are essentially the same thing). If you use anything other than M mode on the camera, the camera will shoot with the lens wide open - it won't stop it down at all (not a problem if you were planning on using that aperture anyway). Otherwise, you set the camera to "M", then set the desired aperture on the lens ring. There's a button on the back that is the AE-L, you push that to temporarily stop down the lens so the camera can meter - you don't have to set the shutter speed at all (you can if you want, just don't press the button). Focus and shoot (I tend to focus first, then meter - don't think it makes a difference).
mtngal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 2, 2006, 12:05 AM   #16
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 52
Default

I'm not sure I understand the part about "you can if you want, just don't press the button". Which button?

mtngal wrote:
Quote:
I often use K lenses (well, M lenses, but they are essentially the same thing). If you use anything other than M mode on the camera, the camera will shoot with the lens wide open - it won't stop it down at all (not a problem if you were planning on using that aperture anyway). Otherwise, you set the camera to "M", then set the desired aperture on the lens ring. There's a button on the back that is the AE-L, you push that to temporarily stop down the lens so the camera can meter - you don't have to set the shutter speed at all (you can if you want, just don't press the button). Focus and shoot (I tend to focus first, then meter - don't think it makes a difference).
themacguy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 2, 2006, 3:30 AM   #17
Senior Member
 
Peacekeeper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 1,024
Default

What he is saying is that you can manually set shutter and aperture using M Mode setting. Manually set aperture ring and then move the thumb wheel to adjust the shutter speed.

Or

Set to M mode, then set aperture ring on the lens (as above), to automatically set the shutter speed to the right setting for the correct esposure (instread of manually turnig the thumb wheel), hit the AE-L button which is marked AE-L to the right of the thumb wheel.

This will cause the camera check the available light and make the appropriate adjustment to the shutter speed.

What he was saying by "Don't hit the button" is if you want to manually set the shutter, dont hit the AE-L button.

Crash
Peacekeeper is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 2, 2006, 5:45 AM   #18
TDN
Senior Member
 
TDN's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 1,288
Default

Oooh, I didn't know that. I thought that using K lenses forced you to use all manual settings.

So basicly pressing the AE-L button while in M mode gives you soem sort of aperture priority setting?

cool, I'll remember that when using my macro extensions

TDN
TDN is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 2, 2006, 7:56 AM   #19
Senior Member
 
ejbrusselsprout's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 137
Default

yes,

i use the ae button as described whenever i use my ext. tubes because they're the "auto" ones which means all manual except they allow focussing and composing with the ap. wide open, then stop down for the shot. with those tubes behind an a or fa type lens (like my sigma 70-300 macro) and the camera on manual the ae button is essentially ap priority and you can still adjust the shutter with the thumb wheel which is like exp. compensation if you want to think of it that way.

i find i often (maybe should say usually) have to bump the shutter as much as a stop or two slower to get a proper exp. using the tubes. can't say i've used manual much with just the lens so don't know if it's the tubes or the meter. it's not much of a problem as i work slow and review (with the histogram) fairly frequently.

if it hasn't been mentioned remember if you're going manual with alens that has an aperture ring you have to set the camera to "allow aperture ring" as the default is to not allow. puzzled why pentax didn't just make the default to allow.

all the best, eric
ejbrusselsprout is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 2, 2006, 11:25 AM   #20
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 52
Default

Many thanks to those who are replying to this thread. I now have a much better understanding of how this all works.


themacguy is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:15 PM.