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Old Aug 6, 2006, 12:11 PM   #1
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As a very new K100D owner for less than one week:

http://www.stevesforums.com/forums/v...01&forum_id=80

I have already tested my new toy fairly thoroughly in the field and also checked its alignment, exposure accuracy and AF accuracy at my home "lab". Unlike my previous Pentax DSLRs I owned, everything just goes fine including no obvious CCD misalignment, no serious metering underexposure errors and metering inconsistency under different metering modes and etc. But then I still find one error, that is, the actual AF sensitive area is aligned downwards from the red AF indication, i.e. the sensitve actual central AF cross is exactly located at the lower 1/3rd of the central bracket as marked in the viewfinder/focusing screen. There is no left/right mis-alignment, though.

Just for those who are interested for more details about my previous terrible experience with all my recent two-year Pentax DSLRs, Optio DC and digital lenses, here it is:-
http://www.geocities.com/ricehigh/A_...rporation.html

My question is that should I exchange this body? I am very hesitated to do so as it may be (very) risky to get another one which might have other accuracy problems. But then my experience is that if I didn't replace another body from the very beginning, Pentax servicing couldn't help in any sense! I do firmly believe that everything had already been determined when the unit was shipped out of the Pentax factory!

Thanks in advance for any thoughts.

RiceHigh
http://www.geocities.com/ricehigh
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Old Aug 6, 2006, 1:19 PM   #2
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Personally you can do two things, pop into the camera shop and try your lens on another K100D and see if the AF spot is located under the red light. If it isn't then change your body if you want.

Or, you can just work around it, it is not like it is a big issue, just know it is there and within a few shots you will automatically aim a little high when focusing and the drop for composition and release your shutter. Mosst subjects are big enough for the point of focus to fill the main area of your viewfinder.

Geez sounds like I am small arms coaching again..:blah:
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Old Aug 6, 2006, 1:32 PM   #3
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Out of interest did you get a reply to that rather longish letter to Pentax?
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Old Aug 6, 2006, 1:38 PM   #4
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After all these alleged 'bad experiences', why haven't you gone to another brand? Please, buy a C or N and leave us who enjoy our Pentax cameras alone.

RG
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Old Aug 6, 2006, 3:52 PM   #5
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Crashman wrote:
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try your lens on another K100D and see if the AF spot is located under the red light.
I'm almost frightened to ask this question because of what I don't know, I can't be worried about, but how do you determine where the AF spot is.

The red dot indicates where the point of focus should be - I'm not aware of there being anything else.
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Old Aug 6, 2006, 4:38 PM   #6
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I would say since you know where its located and it isn't something that is likely to move you would probably be best just compensating for it...
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Old Aug 6, 2006, 10:56 PM   #7
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From your description of the focus point issue, it seems to me that it would never be a problem in real life unless you were trying to focusing on the head of a pin with a regular lens from more than a foot or two (half meter) away.

This seems to me to have little meaning to 90% of practical application for most of us outside of a lab situation, so if you are using the camera for photography other that lab tests, by all means, keep it.

Tom
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Old Aug 6, 2006, 11:19 PM   #8
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"Out of interest did you get a reply to that rather longish letter to Pentax?"

I can not believe you actually asked that question!!!!

Tom
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Old Aug 8, 2006, 2:22 AM   #9
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Crashman wrote:
Quote:
Personally you can do two things, pop into the camera shop and try your lens on another K100D and see if the AF spot is located under the red light. If it isn't then change your body if you want.

Or, you can just work around it, it is not like it is a big issue, just know it is there and within a few shots you will automatically aim a little high when focusing and the drop for composition and release your shutter. Mosst subjects are big enough for the point of focus to fill the main area of your viewfinder.

Geez sounds like I am small arms coaching again..:blah:
Thanks for the suggestion. That's what I think at first. But it seems that now I have no time to go back to the shop and I don't want to bear the risk to try and test another camera body.

I agree that it is a minor problem and actually I won't need to aim at the actual shift area but just the red illuminated mark as the shifted position is only 1/3rd of the central bracket.

It's not ideal but it's acceptable - after reading the response from you folks.

RiceHigh
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Old Aug 8, 2006, 2:24 AM   #10
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ennacac wrote:
Quote:
From your description of the focus point issue, it seems to me that it would never be a problem in real life unless you were trying to focusing on the head of a pin with a regular lens from more than a foot or two (half meter) away.

This seems to me to have little meaning to 90% of practical application for most of us outside of a lab situation, so if you are using the camera for photography other that lab tests, by all means, keep it.

Tom
Thank you for your advice, Tom. And I take your advice.

RiceHigh
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