Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital SLR and Interchangeable Lens Cameras > Pentax / Samsung dSLR, K Mount Mirrorless

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Aug 11, 2006, 4:20 PM   #1
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 268
Default

I like to take macro shots of flowers and such, night time city skylines, and waterfalls. I assume for this I will need a macro lens, a basic 18-55mm and a telephoto 200mm. Does this sound right? In any case, what is the minimum I will need to spend to get the lens I will need? I love photography, but I do have a love for other things as well and so if it going to cost way over my budget to get everything I need, I might as well just stick with a decent prosumer. BTW, the DSLR I am considering is the Pentax ist DL. I have seen them for roughly $450 after the manufacture rebate including the 18-55mm lens. I was hoping that after that I could get a macro lens and telephoto lens for another $400. But it seems that I might not be so lucky as to get into the DSLR arena for this cheap. What to you all think?
Contriver is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Aug 11, 2006, 4:33 PM   #2
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Depends on where & how your buy them. Ebay isn't a bad tool if you use it the right way (and Pentax is about to release a new body, so you better get hopping)! One trick is to look for older Pentax SLR's that have the lenses you want already on them....I found my 50mm/f1.7 that way & it cost half of what just the lenses were selling for.
  Reply With Quote
Old Aug 11, 2006, 5:48 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
bilybianca's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Hassleholm, Sweden
Posts: 3,435
Default

The "entrance fee" to the Pentax system is lower than for C*n*n or N*k*n, and once you're in there are heaps of quality lenses to fullfill your needs. If you know or are prepared to learn the "older" techniques, such as manually choosing aperture and shutter speed you can get very far with cheap, high quality used lenses. If you want to go for the high end stuff it will cost more, but still less than "the other two" brands. If you are prepared to spend 400 USD for a start (after getting the body) you will get far!

Macro lens, fully manual, absolute top quality Pentax SMC-M f4.0 (manual everything) about 150 USD if you're not lucky and find it cheap. (I got mine for free when I bought a second hand body! Nice surprise when I opened the box at the Post Office:-))

Super quality SMC-A 50 mm f1.4 same price range.

Top super quality SMC-A* 200 mm f2.8 400 USD (I got mine for 280)

If you're lycky or have patience you might find these at substancially lower prices in your local paper's private ads or the flea market. There are tons of alternatives in various price and quality ranges; Pentax lenses and third party lenses such as Vivitar, Sigma, Tamron and Takumar. There is no reason to hesitate! But do your homework before buying, ask questions in this forum.

Kjell
bilybianca is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 11, 2006, 6:55 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
Peacekeeper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 1,024
Default

I can't agree more and you can always pick up telephoto macros and basically buy one lens to do two jobs. as an example se this lens now on eBay for US$85.00

http://cgi.ebay.com.au/Sigma-70-300m...QQcmdZViewItem


And NO it is not my sale, just the first one that I found on eBay as an example that does telephoto and macro under a hundred bucks.

You can also pick up a set of extension tubes (cheap under $20USD) that allow you to reduce your minimum focus depth right the way down to allow macro using any normal lens.

eBay is Pentax mount lens hunting territory. Lots of old glass there that is going cheap but produces great results if you don't mind manually focusing.

I have three new AF lenses and about 8 old MF lenses. The three AF ones are now back in their boxes because I feel like I am using a P&S camera when I have them on and I get such great results with the old glass. :lol:

I think you will find that you can pick up all the lenses you need on Ebay and at pawnbrokers and as Kalypso said, sometimes you have to buy that $50 camera AND lens to get that $50 lens :-)

You won't be the firt person to buy a combo and walk ou the door of the shop and dump the camera body in the bin and put the lens in your pocket.
Peacekeeper is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 11, 2006, 10:56 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
mtclimber's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Oregon, USA
Posts: 18,143
Default

Well, it really depends on what lenses you are really intersted in??

Most folks start with the 18-55mm kit lens and add ther Pentax 50-200mm lens at a later date. Actually, both lenses are quite capbale.

MT/Sarah
Attached Images
 
mtclimber is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 11, 2006, 11:18 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 221
Default

Point and shoot cameras are very good at macro photography as their tiny lenses will focus very close to the object being shot, giving good magnification. As these lenses have tiny apertures, these cameras also give good depth of field so you can get all of your subject in focus. Slr lenses cna't focus anywhere near as close and so you need to use a longer focal length lens to get the same magnification. To get the depth of field you need requires a small aperture and hence a long shutter speed and a good tripod. Then, as you've already spent a heap on a nice macro lens and a good tripod, you are going to want to light your subject nicely to make those pics really look good...
As long as your subject is not likely to hop away if you poke a lens at it then you need to spend a LOT to get better macro results with an slr.
Night photography requires a tripod whether you use an slr or not. Waterfalls likewise.
I would buy a P&S and a light-weight tripod and learn how to use them for macro and night photography. If you then find you want to do things that a p&s isn't capable of, then is the time to think of spending a whole lot more...
jacks is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 11, 2006, 11:27 PM   #7
TDN
Senior Member
 
TDN's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 1,288
Default

jacks wrote:
Quote:
I would buy a P&S and a light-weight tripod and learn how to use them for macro and night photography. If you then find you want to do things that a p&s isn't capable of, then is the time to think of spending a whole lot more...
In theory, jacks is right. It will be easier with a P&S.

However, there's something about an SLR that no regular digital camera will ever give you...it's more of a feeling really, but it's there.

Basicly there is no "ideal starter kit". You have to take the risk, and find the equipment you like bit by bit.
The kit lens is a good start, it'll give you a nice idea about what could be better, and what could be worse.
Be ready to spend a lot of time on ebay & reading reviews/forums.

But in the end, all the work, money & effort are more than worth it, and I think everyone here will acknowledge that.

TDN
TDN is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 12, 2006, 3:08 AM   #8
Super Moderator
 
peripatetic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 3,599
Default

Also don't confuse true 1:1 macro with a close-up shot.

Even ordinary lenses on an SLR can give some very good closeups. Most lenses go to 1:4 or so. Which means the image on the sensor is 1/4 size of the real world object.

That's plenty big enough for most shots of flowers, butterflies, etc. But not enough for smaller insects.

With a P&S you don't have to worry of course, they are generally very good at simple macro work.
peripatetic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 12, 2006, 3:31 PM   #9
Member
 
SelrahCharleS's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 72
Default

That depends on whether you want autofocus or not... I know some of the Pentax manual focus lenses are of excellent quality and very cheap. Check keh.com and look and the Pentax manual focus lenses on there.
SelrahCharleS is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Aug 12, 2006, 5:50 PM   #10
Senior Member
 
Catbells's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 874
Default

mtclimber wrote:
Quote:
Well, it really depends on what lenses you are really interested in??

Most folks start with the 18-55mm kit lens and add ther Pentax 50-200mm lens at a later date. Actually, both lenses are quite capable.

MT/Sarah
Agreed.

Yo can spend as much as you like but with this combination, you can cover focal lengths from 18mm to 200mm with adequate close up facilities.
Catbells is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 9:04 PM.