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-   -   i know, i know, i blew out the highlights (https://forums.steves-digicams.com/people-photos-12/i-know-i-know-i-blew-out-highlights-159585/)

Dr. Mr. Vandertramps Sep 13, 2009 12:23 AM

i know, i know, i blew out the highlights
 
but come on, this is cute.

http://i144.photobucket.com/albums/r...s/Dsc07542.jpg


The question is, do blown highlights always ruin a shot for you? they kind of do for me, but should they? i dunno. I really like this shot, and i actually feel guilty for doing so. weird, eh??

Walter_S Sep 13, 2009 5:13 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dr. Mr. Vandertramps (Post 1000287)
...The question is, do blown highlights always ruin a shot for you?...

You have my sympaty for the blown highlights, because I tend to get'em myself often enough.

I think this shot IS cute, regardless of what photographers might say, and it doesn't take away this exciting moment, the eyes full of spirit, expectations and adventure. A nice capture of a split-second in a childs life.

As long as you know your audience (friends, family) it doesn't matter, they won't notice the blown areas. Showing it off here - you do stick your neck out!
:o

Great capture!

Bynx Sep 13, 2009 6:08 AM

When you take a picture its up to you to say whether its good or bad. You only have to please yourself. You do have a really cute picture here. No denying that. But if it was properly exposed, then when you look at it, there would be no faults and you would have a satisfaction of looking at it and saying "perfect". On the other hand, if you had fiddled more with the camera to get that "perfect" exposure, you might have lost the shot. It really is priceless in spite of the highlights. I would say she is a keeper.

JohnG Sep 13, 2009 8:11 AM

I agree the shot is a keeper. With a 3 year old son myself I concur with Bynx - spend too much time fiddling with settings and you miss the moment. I'd rather end up with a shot like this with some technical imperfections but a great expression and still sharp as opposed to a technically perfect shot that's boring

Joe Sellers Sep 13, 2009 9:19 AM

I think Bynx put it very well.

IMHO it's the subject that counts and not missing that special moment in time vs being the worlds best photographer.

That's why I am a point & shoot guy. It takes time to be good at your craft or chosen "serious" hobby. I don't have that time & have too many other hobbies.

While I would like to get better than aim and click.
Her expression is worth a thousand missed highlights. Enjoy the very special moment !

....And hey, what a great contrast to your forum picture! <G>

Chato Sep 13, 2009 10:50 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dr. Mr. Vandertramps (Post 1000287)
but come on, this is cute.

The question is, do blown highlights always ruin a shot for you? they kind of do for me, but should they? i dunno. I really like this shot, and i actually feel guilty for doing so. weird, eh??

Blown highlights spoil not ruin a shot.

This is a good capture. Could have been a great capture. But if this is someone special to the photographer, then the moment is preserved, and will be heart warming down the road, highlights blown or not.

Dave

Nichole_Jensen Sep 15, 2009 2:50 PM

I LOVE this picture. These are the shots I live to take of kids. Adorable. Personally I dont' think the highlights ruined the picture at all even though it could have been better.

bahadir Sep 16, 2009 2:04 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dr. Mr. Vandertramps (Post 1000287)
but come on, this is cute.
The question is, do blown highlights always ruin a shot for you? they kind of do for me, but should they? i dunno. I really like this shot, and i actually feel guilty for doing so. weird, eh??

Very cute indeed:cool2: Given the harsh lighting condition, much better than a typical picture with a very dark face that would cause a muddy colour and smeared out features while trying to recover. As for your question 'Do blown highlights always ruin a shot for you?' My quick answer would be: No! Providing of course they are deliberately intended...You can see many good examples in which the blown areas direct even more interest on the subject. But you can crop a little from the top to get rid of some distracting highlight areas and use the burn tool on the blown areas on the gate and partly on the left handside bottom part of the skirt (after a highlight/shadow adjustment) until they don't look distracting anymore. Feeling guilty? On the contrary, you should feel proud for not missing the moment as Bynx put above : )

sdromel Sep 16, 2009 3:32 AM

There should be a way to work the overblown areas in PhotoShop. For example, there are techniques for eliminating reflections in glass. Sometimes I'll use the Burn Tool to darken an area that is too bright.

This is actually an important topic of discussion as digital cameras notoriously are dynamic range challenged particularly P&S ones.

Hopefully there will be some good suggestions/ideas submitted.

Bynx Sep 16, 2009 5:41 AM

1 Attachment(s)
I dont agree with sdromel's advice regarding Photoshop. In my opinion, the burn tool is really pretty useless, except in certain cases. In blown out areas,there is texture which is gone. The burn tool will add a grey shade to the white area and thats about it. The texture can not be replaced. So you go from bad to worse. You would be better off using the Shadow/Highlight feature. You did make me wonder what Photoshop could do so I tried the Exposure sliders.


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