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Old Apr 14, 2009, 11:54 PM   #11
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my shot was taken at iso 100 / 200 f8 but the lighting was good
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Old Apr 15, 2009, 12:16 AM   #12
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Simple

i could tell your ISO was something less the 400. Gawds I am sooooooooo Ol' Schooled.

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Old Apr 15, 2009, 7:54 AM   #13
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SternSteve,

The setting of the photo is, in my opinion, a very pretty site. I've tried taking photos there in the evening, but the sun is in the face of the subject, so they squint their eyes.

So, Easter morning, on our way to church, we stopped for the shots. The morning sun is behind my daughter and just off to the right, so it's not in the photo. But early morning sun was shining in my face as I took the shot.

With that amount of sun, and the sun low on the horizon, it seemed like 400 ISO was the right setting. BUT I'M NOT AN EXPERIENCED PHOTOGRAPHER, so I'm hoping guys like you, will comment and help.

Details on the photo of my daugher in front of the house... f5.6, iso 400, 1/160 55mm sRGB.

Did I go wrong simply by choosing the wrong time of day to shoot and not controlling the light?

Or are your comments referring to my son & daughter photo? If you're asking why did I shoot ISO 400 in doors. On that one, I am pretty sure I had the my camera on fully auto, and it chose ISO 400, not me. Why did I do that??? (See the words in all capital letters above).









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Old Apr 15, 2009, 1:51 PM   #14
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Hi Pastor,



I had a look at your photos and here is my (hopefully) constructive feedback.



1. You first post: Although your daughter is in better focus than your son, she is not particularly in the best focus one could expect from this range. The distance differential between both subjects (son in the back) is to blame for this IMHO. I would strongly suggest avoiding this type of composition and focus (no pun intended) on putting them in poses where they share the same plane. The lighting is not bad at all.



2. You 2[suP]nd[/suP] post: really not different than the first so the same comments apply. In my experience, graininess does not increase if you shrink an image, so I donpt think this is the cause. Although the sharpening done by Simple helps your daughter significantly it cannot rescue your son because of the degree of "softness" in the original photos (both of them).



3. The monopod should have helped you steady the first set of photos, but I find that 1/60[suP]th[/suP] too slow for ISO 400 and that, coupled with the range differential combined to make the photos os son & daughter soft. That and the fact that human subjects are never ever stock still – with the possible exception of professional models. At ISO 400, I would have started at 1/320[suP]th[/suP], and worked my way down to 1/100[suP]th[/suP] and then check – on the computer - to see which combination was the most successful.



4. Photo of daughter outside: you asked what do we think about the sharpening. It's fair but not quite there either. The lighting is nice – no severe shadows to clutter the face / neck area so time of day not really an issue. As to the composition – or the setting, as you refer to it, it depends on what you wanted to achieve. If you wanted "daughter in front of the house", OK, you got that. If you wanted to highlight your daughter's natural beauty, then the house is a definite distraction. However, the tree behind her has HUGE potential if you can pose her standing, leaning, and / or siting on /next to it because of its presence and the texture of the bark. It would have to be in relatively the same plane as your daughter to get it in focus.


Sorry for rambling …… but I hope this helps. Regards, Dan
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Old Apr 15, 2009, 2:25 PM   #15
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Your ramblins are most appreciated!!

I did a peek a boo shot with my daughter and the tree.

I'll try speeding up the time value of my next set of indoor photos.

I didn't think my son would be so out of focus. But the idea about standing further away and zooming in makes sense translating the little I know about depth of field, that comment makes perfect sense to me. Rather than my son's face being sharp, it "depth of fielded" (I may want to copywrite that word...).

Taking the camera off the nice green fully automatic box on my dial is like taking the training wheels off of a bicycle...

Please comment on the new photo.

No feelings hurt here. Again, thanks for the advice!!






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Old Apr 15, 2009, 8:25 PM   #16
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Faithful

I was commenting on the firstportrait of your Son and Daughter. I did not mean to be as deraugatory as I fear you have interpeted me. I too am no professional either, as most of my posts here will verify.

I just could not understand using ISO 400 when you were using flash. As the higher the ISO the grainier you shots will be, IMO. Only in extreme low lighting do I boost the ISO over 200.


Yes, taking your camera off that little green box, auto, is like taking the training wheels off your bike:Gbut, the amount of control you gain, is well worth therisk.
My first instructorat the night school course in phot gave us this acronym, F.A.S.T.
I got the first three letters really quickly but the 4th had me stumped for a long while.
F - film ie: colour, b/w, ISO, colour balance
A - arpeture
S - shutter
T - think...how ironic is that..:G
And here is a GREAT place to learn, from "pro's", "semi pro's" and seasoned amatuers. I have found the information, and critiques given here most enlightening.
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Old Apr 15, 2009, 9:56 PM   #17
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Dear SternSteve,

You said:

"I was commenting on the firstportrait of your Son and Daughter. I did not mean to be as deraugatory as I fear you have interpeted me."



First, I read nothing derragatory in your comments. Nothing. Thanks for posting your comments.

Second, I think, if I'm going to get better I at photography, I don't anyone blowing sunshine in my ear telling me my stuff is great when it stinks. I want them to tell me WHY it stinks.

Third, if someone posts a photo on this website and asks for comments and they're not ready to accept the criticism as well as the praise, then they should show the photos to their grandmothers and no one else. (Grandma's think their grandkids can do no wrong).

So as far as I am concerned.... bring it on, baby. I'm tougher than you might think.

Semper Fi,

FP.


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Old Apr 16, 2009, 11:08 AM   #18
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Hi Pastor, happy to help out andI appreciate your openess tomy suggestions.

Before going any further, can you tell me the brand and modelof your camera and, if it is a DSLR (digital single-lens reflex) camera, what lens you're using?Although moving away from the "All Auto ModeGreen Dial" can seem daunting, it doesn't have to be. The next step up from that in the learning process is the ProgramMode - usually depicted by the letter P on the photo preference dial.In P mode, a lot of things are still decided by the camera but many of these decisions are influenced by the settings that you do have control over - i.e., they are not automated. These are the Flash, the Exposure and the White Balance.Here's a link that sheds some light on this mode (Nikon DSLR used in this case).

http://lifehacker.com/software/featu...ode-323605.php

And another: http://blog.fotonomy.com/tips/master...-program-mode/

As to your last photo post, you're getting there.I would have disengaged your daughter's head from the tree just a smidgen to get all of her features, in this casethe left side of her face / long hair.By the way, there is an imporant (I would say critical) rule that you should knowfor composingphotos. It's called the Rule of Thirds. Putting this rule in practicemay help your compositions. I found this link to be short, simple andillustrative:

http://digital-photography-school.com/rule-of-thirds

At the end of the day, probably the mostimportant point to remember with ROT is to avoid putting your subject smack-dab in the center of the photograph; this opens up all kinds of creative possibilites.

Let me know how you fared with the links -email me privately if you wish to take this long thread off-board. Regards, Dan


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Old Apr 28, 2009, 6:29 PM   #19
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A friend has asked me to photograph her and her jumping horse.

For the portraits (their two faces side by side pose) I'm thinking, 100mm, AP, 2.8f, flash, indoor/barn, with me about 12-15 feet away. Focus point on human face.

Does that sound about right?


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Old May 22, 2009, 9:27 AM   #20
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jindi, I hope, as a contributing new member, you intend to do more than just advertise your site. This is the second plug Ive seen in less than 5 minutes. While I agree photos on canvas is the best way to exhibit the best of the best photos, I dont want to see you posting your repetitious ads. Have you cleared your actions through an administrator here?
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