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Old Oct 21, 2010, 11:37 AM   #21
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Hi Jelpee;

Thanks for the note. I appreciate it very much.

Attached is partner picture for #7. My idea was to have two photos one with Mikki turned to the right, then one to the left.

From Mark's comments I realize that my idea was half right. Mark advised me to have Mikki facing the wide side (as she is in this shot) of the photograph.

Still, I like the combination of the two, I wish I had his advice before I shot these.

FP
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Old Oct 21, 2010, 6:02 PM   #22
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DigMe[/LEFT];1157263]pastor,

Mark's comments are going to be way more educated than my own but in that situation where I'm in the shade with a bright background I would try metering the bright part, locking the exposure and then stepping back and snapping the shot. Then later you can bring up the brightness of the underexposed foreground in PP. I might also try some fill flash. I probably would do all of the above and see which came out best.

brad
I will disagree on this, always meter for your subject, if you are trying to pull back the exposure on the subject you will be adding noise and losing detail. If you want an exposure to match then you need to get extra light on the subject be it moving them, reflecting light or flash/strobe. Or shoot the exposure for the subject and darken the background in PP. Personally I don't mind a blown background in a shot it will still tell part of the story and bring the focus into the subject (assuming they are correctly exposed).
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Old Oct 21, 2010, 6:08 PM   #23
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Mark, again, thank you for your critique of my work.

And again, as you read my comment, you know I am not disagreeing with you. Only a the fool argues with the expert.

Let's see if I'm learning anything....

I sort of liked this shot 1616A because of the angle of the shoulders.

But her arms being so straight, to me it make the shot look tense. And as you would point out, both arms are doing the same thing so the shot becomes less interesting.

If I really liked the entire photo, I'd photoshop out the white spray painted snake that appears on the wood to the left of Mikki.

Also, I'm not convinced the angle from which I took the shot is good. I think I'm shooting upward too much. I should have stood taller. I fight the height/angle a lot, I'm 2 meters tall. That's much taller than my daughter, so I'm trying to get that right as well.
Wow, you are taller than me, I'm just over 198cm, that potentially makes you the tallest member here!!

Regarding height, shooting from below is not the best as it can bring in extra chins..... fine for your daughters age though, less good for the rest of us. With a lady, usually shoot from just above their height, however like all things it is not set in stone. For example if there is a horizon through the head, I would rather go a little lower and lose that if possible, it's about compromise most of the time unless you are going for the one perfect shot.

I would suggest with the hands further up the legs still, that will allow (hopefully) a little amount of arm bend. Also, possibly, not sure about sitting in this position) to have her sit more to one side with that arm down..... you would have to try it, I can't quite picture the result in my head without her falling off or looking a bit silly.
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Old Oct 21, 2010, 6:22 PM   #24
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What I liked about this shot was the sunlight on her hair on the left side. Her arms are less tense, but the hands are still, blah.

I also don't like the crop at her knees and as you would say, the wickedly straight arm on the right side of the photo is not good.

My big question is the background. I was shooting in a gazebo. A gazebo is a basically a stand alone structure that is about the size of a large living room of a house. They are often round or 8 sided in shape. All the walls are open and there's a roof overhead.

The roof supplied me with shade from the early afternoon sun, so that helped the shots to not washout. But I also got this really bright/hazy background in a shot like this. In later shots, I moved the subject and myself so I had a green tree for a background rather than open space.

Is the background, under these conditions so useless that moving is the correct answer? When I moved, I lost the sun on the hair highlights.

FP
I like this one a lot more, apart from the knees as you pointed out. As I mentioned in an earlier post, I don't mind bringt backgrounds. The arms could to a bit further up still but this is a more comfortable shot The natural hair light has worked out nicely as well so I would certainly consider using this area again.
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Old Oct 21, 2010, 6:29 PM   #25
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While trying to help my daughter figure out we wanted her to do, in the shot, my bride jumped up to the light pole and struck a pose as an example for our daughter to see.

I was ready and I took this shot of her.

If you've ever read the story about the frog who felt like a prince because the princess kissed him, you've read my biography.

FP
Nice shot, pretty wife, seems like you and I have the same biography LOL. So now we just need a photo of you to have seen the whole family

Glad that everyone is keen to help out, it makes it a lot of fun. My wife gets a bit bored with me sometime, I know having kids is going to help take the heat off of her. (Just a note, I'm not only planning kids to be photographic models).
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Old Oct 21, 2010, 6:35 PM   #26
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Hi Jelpee;

Thanks for the note. I appreciate it very much.

Attached is partner picture for #7. My idea was to have two photos one with Mikki turned to the right, then one to the left.

From Mark's comments I realize that my idea was half right. Mark advised me to have Mikki facing the wide side (as she is in this shot) of the photograph.

Still, I like the combination of the two, I wish I had his advice before I shot these.

FP
Really like this one, the background works well to give context, nice body turn away from the camera and good expression. Just the folded arms again but hey, we can't have everything

Don't worry about not knowing everything, seriously, there is so much I don't know and mistakes I make on a shoot that it drives me crazy. One step at a time and keep building on what you do. Getting things wrong sometimes helps us to know what not to do another. I try to learn from the mistakes of others (it's less painful) but lots of times I just have to learn from my own. If something works, do it more and modify/improve where possible, if it doesn't then put it down to learning.

I think that's everything sorted out, time for me to get to bed now. Night all!!!
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Old Nov 8, 2010, 5:01 PM   #27
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Default Grandma wanted a shot of both kids together

Both of our children are musicians (mom's a piano teacher, dad is a trumpet player). So grandma asked for a photo of them together with their instruments.

We used a white sheet to cover the window to serve as a background for this shot.
You can see the faint grid of the window panes in the background. How distracting is that to the photo?

The daughter's hand are a bit hidden, but if I moved to the left, to see more of her hands, then I started losing space between the kids. My son's hand laying on top of the guitar is a bit out of place, but if he put it in a strumming position, then the piano would block it.

Thanks for your c & c.

Faithfully yours,
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Old Nov 9, 2010, 11:29 AM   #28
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Lovely shots.

#1 is my favourite.

Mark gives good advice, and yet...

I know why you have chosen the shots you did. Not because you are a photographer, but because you are her father and those shots speak to an aspect of her character and your relationship that are more important than the slight technical flaws.

So what does one do about that? I don't know. But these shots are not just about presenting the "subject" in a flattering manner. They are about capturing moments that you can look back on which will flood your mind and soul with memories and love.

So for image #2: as a general rule eye contact would be good, or at least being able to follow through the lines of sight to what the dog is looking at. Also the nose is not flattering in this profile. But I don't care when I look at the shot because I know that what you have actually captured is the relationship between a girl and her dog. Her affection and amusement at the antics, a loving protective embrace, a warm half smile, unposed, unpretentious, relaxed, happy. And all of that is far more important, and will be why you chose that shot for presentation in the first place; because of how it made you feel when you looked at it. Perhaps something your wife said when she saw it or the look in her eyes. It is a shot filled with more beauty than anything you could ever see in Vogue.

Not crazy about the busy bark background in #3, but that laugh. Oh my.

Missed focus slightly on #4, but the way she is looking at you!

#5 - Sometimes when I look at (or photograph) my 6 year old I see her at 16; here I look at your daughter and see her as she was at 6. And so do you right? The frame is a little too busy for me, but it doesn't matter because you nailed the important thing, the connection to you is so very strong and clear to see.

You see where I'm going with these comments of course. When you take pictures of your family, of people so close to you, you will be making selections on things that are not purely photographic, features and characteristics that come through only to those people who have known them too.

So sure, there are things to work on technically (though in general they are very good - I didn't realise you'd come this far so quickly) but in the most important aspect of emotion and character you have absolutely - nailed. every. single. shot. So these are great documentary pictures.

But as your technique and vision continue to grow you will find it easier to make other people see what you see. I'm looking forward to it.

And learning to bring that vision and sensitivity to pictures of people not your family would truly put you on the path to being an extraordinary photographer. There are some artists who move back to a more stark documentary style, less flattering, less fashion-like, as they mature - precisely because they don't want the viewer to be distracted by flash. I think perhaps you are at a turning point - you could go either way, or why not - perhaps do both?

For the documentary route - see Michelle Sank or Annie Liebowitz's early or private work ,for the beauty in every day life route see Sally Mann.
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