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Old Aug 27, 2004, 12:52 PM   #11
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THANKS everyone for all the great tips. Having all this new knowledge I should be able to take some photos like the pros. Speaking of pros, this girl is paying me to photograph her, so I guess that makes me a pro. This will be my first job (ever) I'm only in high school and have never had a job. It's not your most conventional first job for a high schooler, I mean I could have worked at a fast food place this summer. I will be sure to post of few of the better photos on here for your criticism. THANKS again.
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Old Aug 27, 2004, 2:06 PM   #12
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I ment to ask, where should I have the photos taken?
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Old Aug 27, 2004, 2:08 PM   #13
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find a place with shadows and not direct sunlight for outside.

Getting paid, wow I never get paid for photo's .

Greetings,
Frank
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Old Aug 27, 2004, 2:17 PM   #14
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So under a tree in a grass area would be good?
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Old Aug 27, 2004, 2:20 PM   #15
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And what about for inside work? I read about it and it recommended to pin up a white bed sheet on the wall and have it flow over a couch or something. Got any different suggestions for inside stuff? Also what about props? Are props good?
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Old Aug 27, 2004, 3:07 PM   #16
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Grass and tree's are alway's good.
In house the white will work very nicely but also drapes.

Props are nice when the model has problems posing but most of the time it will degrade a picture, it's very hard to do a GOOD prop shoot .

Greetings,
Frank
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Old Aug 27, 2004, 4:06 PM   #17
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Here are some of the photos I have taken recently. http://www.youthwindsurfing.com/photopage/gallery/
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Old Aug 27, 2004, 5:25 PM   #18
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I'll toss in a few pennies...

Outdoors works well in open shade on sunny days (but watch out for bright sunny areas behind your subject). Although, cloudy days are the best (it's the biggest softbox in the world).

Never shoot a woman "straight on" (sitting or standing)...it will make her hips look wide, even though we all know they are not ;-)

Shadows are your friends...they keep the shot dynamic & interesting.

You subject doesn't need to be centered in every picture (some rule of thirds thingy).

She doesn't have to look straight at the camera & smile. Having her head at an angle, glancing back to the camera keeps the image from looking like it was made at Sears. She doesn't even need to look at the camera at all...but keep open space in the frame in the direction she is looking.

(Here's something to try...have her tilt her head, downward & about 40 degrees away from the camera. Now have her take a deep breath, shoulders back (posture 101), glance back at the camera & slowly exhale out of slightly parted lips. This will look sexy in about 99% of women).

Backdrops/backgrounds (indoor or out) should be more-or-less out of focus (unless you are shooting a swimsuit or Victorias Secret Ad)...you want the focal point to be the person (& focus on her eyes, as Frank said).

Apologies if I repeated something Frank touched on...


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Old Aug 27, 2004, 7:00 PM   #19
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I took this photo today. Its lacking something though. Its lacking a HOT cowgirl leaning on the fence.
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Old Aug 27, 2004, 10:47 PM   #20
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And, where would you put that Hot Cowgirl? How would you change the image to make the Hot Cowgirl the focal point? Is this a good or bad spot for a portrait (direct vs indirect lighting)? Does the lighting look flattering to a model to you? Is the depth of the image too hazy or perfect for a picture of a lady (even if it's out of focus, it looks better if it's well defined)? Are the lighting & shadows here going to be harsh or helpful? Do you plan on keeping the fence, girl & trees in focus or pick one subject to concentrate on? What about the partial building in the background? Do you plan on changing your perspective to eliminate them from the viewer?

I'm no expert by any means...just throwing out some things to think about ;-)

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