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Old Oct 17, 2004, 1:36 AM   #11
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Tom Overton wrote:
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Hi Kalypso;

Thanks for the great tips. In truth, I had heard much of this before, but not all in one place. Nice shots, by the way. Question regarding make-up... what do you suggest to your models before a shoot? Just curious.

Regards,
Tom, on Point Pelee, Canada
Thanks Tom,
Here's a link to a makeup guide written by a professional makeup artist, friend & model:
http://home.comcast.net/~ka1yps01/Makeup.htm
I normally point my models to this as a guide & (depending on the shoot), I'll make suggestions based on it too. As you can see, most of the above images were made with little to zero amount of makeup.

BTW,this is the professional makeup artist & model Gayle:


Glamour style images follow the same guidelines but are easier to explain & I can ususally help them with this basic guideline: Do your makeup like you are going out at night in dim lighting. Then take it up a notch making it darker & heavier than normal. Darker lipstick, no pinks, glitter or shiny makeup.
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Old Oct 17, 2004, 5:41 AM   #12
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Hi,
I hope Kalypso doesn't mind me adding somethings .

Next to reflectors a good use of flash is also very powerfull, you must however take care that you balance the flash correctly.
Outside I alway's use a omnibounce on my flash.

Indeed find the shade or the natural shade of buildings or trees.
Direct sunlight is your worst enemy.

Also take care of too much overshoot from the sun, while looking good on the eye it can blow out your camera, so avoid that.

Some examples from me.


Here I used the natural light of a window to play with light and dark, this takes some planning and the chance you get it correctly without extra help is almost a dream, but this one is close of the more than 30 I shot .


Here I used the blownout effect as a backlight for the model, a sort of shadow play.

A totally different setup is used in the following, here I used a flash unit on a very high boost set to give it a more harsch look.

Here on the hand you can see the effect of too much sun, I hated that but loved the shot so I use it anyway , and fits this example good.


Here we used the shadow and the flash on a slightly lower setting.

For this shot I used the sun on the angle to get the colors of the cloathing better and a small fill in flash to get the faces properly lighted.


And the last one's this is all natural sunlight with a little fill in flash, but FULL sun, no shade. So it can be done.




Sorry for the many pictures, and sorry Kalypso for adding to your thread.

Greetings,
Frank




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Old Oct 17, 2004, 3:06 PM   #13
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Good stuff Frank! Here's my "shot in full sunlight shot":


It helped that it was close to 8am...noon is a PITA!
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Old Oct 17, 2004, 6:25 PM   #14
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Just our of curiosity...Kalypso...what is your opinion on shadows on the subject...like the last picture you posted with half of her face in the shadow...I have heard mixed opinions...some saying you need to avoid that with fill flash and some say that the shadow is part of the picture and the way it should be.

I personally think the shadow adds more artistic value to the photo.
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Old Oct 18, 2004, 3:29 AM   #15
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Hi,
Shadows can add depth to a picture, but it's very personal if you like it, and also picture independent.
You have to choose for every picture what to do.

Greetings,
Frank
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Old Oct 18, 2004, 7:04 PM   #16
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I agree with Frank. It's totally dependent to what you are trying to accomplish with the photo. In the image of Gayle leaning against the railing, I wanted to capture the contrast of her beauty while using the railing & it's shadows to give the image a more edgy feel. If I had filled in the shadows on her face, it would have changed the whole effect of the image.

Here's a few examples of how the feel of an image can be altered by the setting & lighting. In the next 2 images, it is the same model & the images were taken about 2hrs apart.


This was taken in open shade under a large old tree In Fort Payne, AL. Another photographer supplied light onto her face from about 40 feet away using a 42" gold reflector. Without that fill light, her eye sockets would have created unwanted darkness under her eyes.


This was taken indoors at an old, abandoned sock factory in Fort Payne (sock capital of the world ;-). There were banks of windows running down each wall to her left & right. While I had an off camera flash & softbox attached to my camera...I turned them off for this shot. Her outfit & the lighting made for a more dramatic shot.
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