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Old Nov 28, 2004, 8:52 PM   #1
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Taken with a Nikon Coolpix 5400

Any suggestions would be helpful!
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Old Nov 29, 2004, 6:24 AM   #2
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This is kind'a hard to answer...suggestions like what? Don't shoot portraits in direct sunlight (or of you must, use a reflector or fill flash to light the shadowed areas)?

Crop tighter...what's that thing on the left in the water? Plus the log on the right...both could be avoided if you had come in tighter on the main subject. Try shooting the image like you would want it as a finished product (crop with your camers to eliminate the log...after all, he is facing away from it).

It's ususally a good idea to shoot people with the background slightly out of focus (but not always). If you had high, massive waves with lots of spray & dark clouds in the background, it would add a lot to the shot.

Personally, I would have asked him to stand or sit in open shade & taken the shot there. I also might have used natural or man-made reflectors to fill the shadodows.

I played with it a bit...hope you don't mind.
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Old Nov 29, 2004, 10:08 AM   #3
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This picture is fine... AOK, leave it alone. It's a snapshot, not a posed art piece. Wonking around with it would add little to nothing. It's nicely composed, properly exposed, and sharp. It's interesting in a minimalist sorta way... he's off center, with a diagonal shadow, and three large horizontal strips of color and texture - the sky, sand, and ocean that are interupted by the vertical intersection with the plane of the subject. His head is right about where it should be per the rule of thirds. The partial objects (log on the right and boat[?] on the left) that extend beyone the frame provide a sense of vastness... there's more here than is contained in the frame.

Blurring the background/low DOF lends itself better to close-up subjects in foilage (birds in braches...) and natural light candids in living rooms, not to beach shots. It's often overused or inappropriately used... especially in 35mm film. It's a bright sunny day on a beautiful beach, why not show it in all its crisp, clear, colorful glory? It certainly doesn't distract and is intergal to the setting and the mood/tone of the photo.

Sometimes I import a pic to PS... crop it here, add this filter or that, fool around with the various levels think I've improved it..... until I compare it to the original when 9X out of 10 I delete the re-worked photo.

It's a snapshot... and as far as snaps go, it's a very good one.
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Old Nov 29, 2004, 11:57 AM   #4
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Thanks for the tips, I will keep those in mind next time I shoot!! :-)
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