Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Post Your Photos > People Photos

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Oct 15, 2005, 12:59 PM   #1
Moderator
 
Frank Doorhof's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Posts: 2,320
Default

One problem you see with a lot of starting photographers is the way they build to an end result.

Most of the time when there are 3 flashes they will start out with 3 flashes, when there are 4 flashes they will use 4 etc.

Off course sometimes this can give you a wonderful picture, but when you have to make the same shot again you will have a problem because most of the times you don't know how you did it.

In my workshops I always stress my group to look and measure the setups. If you make series for a magazine and the customers wants one more exactly the same you can very easily recreate the look.

Always write down the settings and positions of the light when you want to be able to recreate the effect later on.

I will show in 4 pictures how I build up the light in one shot so you can very easily recreate this setting.

I used a black paper background, one soft box on the front right (my right), one soft box on the back at the right side, one gridded flash on the back at the left side and finally one flash from the ceiling with an umbrella.

The flashes are all pointed at the model, when you want to recreate the effect position every flash very carefully and set one flash at a time. The best way to do this is in total darkness, this way you can exactly see what effect they have.


Picture 1:
Here you see the main light only, the main light (soft box) measured F8.0.
When looking carefully you can see that although the model is lighted correctly the hair of the model is disappearing into the background.


Picture 2:
On this picture I added the ceiling hair light this flash measured F5.6 and will just add a little glow on the hair on the top of the models head.
Be careful not to overpower the hair lights, also look very careful when placing the lights and adjusting the power. A blonde model will need different power and placement as a dark haired model.


Picture 3:
In step 3 I added a rim light on myleft side, angled from behind the model pointing at her side. This will give a nice glow to the hair, which is now standing out of the background, and as an added bonus it adds a nice effect on the arm and dress which makes the model really jumps out from the dark background.


Picture 4:
Here I added a second rim light to give more effect on the left side. This is a personal taste, I love to use 2 rim lights because, whatever background I use it will let the model stand out from the background, especially in glamour photography this will give a wonderful feel and look to the picture.

All rims are measured at F8.0


Greetings,
Frank

ps.
Part out of my new book .


Frank Doorhof is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Oct 15, 2005, 3:29 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
ZAKD's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 962
Default

Thanks Frank for your quick leasson I see the point allready withou trying, hmm,well yes, the hardest part will be to use your advise in work.

If you are free give some additional leasson or tell us how to get your book.

Regards Zak
ZAKD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 16, 2005, 3:48 AM   #3
Moderator
 
Frank Doorhof's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Posts: 2,320
Default

The book will be released somewhere arround Xmas.
I'm now on page 90 I want to go above 100 .
Frank Doorhof is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 16, 2005, 8:36 AM   #4
Senior Member
 
jp80's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 268
Default

I appreciate when there are users┬┤information how to improve our pictures!

jp80
jp80 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 16, 2005, 10:21 AM   #5
Senior Member
 
ZAKD's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 962
Default

Maybe it is not place to ask this kind of question, but since you started with teaching I will be free:

I have a constant "problem" when shooting without flash. Well the problem appears in blurring parts when object moves a little or I'm not using the tripod. My camera is without Image stabilizator (dont know if the DSLR camera has it) model NIKON 8700 and with built-in flash.

Usually I start with following numbers: using M mode for all manual, start with F2.8 for best quality (this is the most wide that I can go), set ISO to 50 also for best quality (my options are from 50 to 400), No flash, and then adjust shutter speed depending from the light where often is 1" or 2" even 4". It is too slow but I want to make some shadow pictures. If I want to increase the speed to 1/30 or 1/60 I have to change Iso what make me loose quality well I mean, lot of noise appeared. Is there something that you can suggest to improve my settings and pictures?

Thanks

Regards Zak

ZAKD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 16, 2005, 12:34 PM   #6
Moderator
 
Frank Doorhof's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Posts: 2,320
Default

With a tripod and a model that can hold her breath anything between 1/4 and 1 second should work.

Normally DON'T shoot under 1/60's

When movement is involved don't go under 1/160's

I would not shoot wide open on any lens, stopped down a lens will be sharper, normally 1 stop stopped down will improve a bit, 2-3 stops will be optimal.
Frank Doorhof is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 2:13 PM.