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Old Jul 5, 2007, 6:54 AM   #11
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DigitalGal wrote:
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Thanks, Bahadir, for sharing this photo with us!

This is a very meaningful image.. I like the very determined expression in your Digital Rebel's face.. what is his name, by the way? I would really like to see more of tour images, while following him.. He makes a great subject!

Thanks for your kind appreciation! That's a keen observation from you, again. Whateverhe deals with, I too like his expression of determination on this guy's face in general: )By the way, his name is Boğaçhan ! Would look nice on the back of an ice-hockey team uniform I suppose:lol: (His sister placed 7th nation wide in artistic ice skating )...Below you see what hewas like when he was three!

http://forums.steves-digicams.com/fo...mp;forum_id=88

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Dear Hercules,

This pic. was not shot by the original Rebel which I borrowed from my friend.

So you remember it After the setting and the tips I showed him he's very happily using it ; )



Thank you for your kindinterest : )



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Old Jul 7, 2007, 12:24 PM   #12
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bahadir

Now this is a significant photo of a revolutionary-to-be. Wonderful body language and face expression

Che, that´s some brand for leftists of all ages and all over the world.

You don´t happen to have more exposures and/or just a little more of the surrounding area

Torgny



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Old Jul 7, 2007, 8:20 PM   #13
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You know... innitially i didn't think too much of the photo. But after reading all the replies, boy.... was i wrong
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Old Jul 7, 2007, 8:52 PM   #14
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This is an interesting photo of a small boy tracing some letters on a wall with his finger.

THAT DOES NOT MAKE HIM A FUTURE REVOLUTIONARY!!!

He was simply taking the opportunity to play with something he recognized. That is, the letters C, H & E. I don't know for a fact, and I'm certain that bahadirwill correct me if I'm wrong, but I think the chance he's ever even heard of Che Guevara is pretty small.

What I do find remarkable about this shot is that someone would have written 'CHE' on a wall in what I presume isa town in Turkey, and at a level that a small boy could stop to play with it. But I am just as likely to believe that the original graffiti artist had intended to write 'CHEVY' but was chased off before he could finish.

While I do like the image, I do not attach a great amount of significance to the juxtaposition of the boy and the graffiti.
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Old Jul 8, 2007, 1:47 AM   #15
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TCav

TCav. Do you really think that a US car brand has more significance than the name of the revolutionary hero Che Guevara?

You could read works on the history from Truman to Bush. Historian Howard Zinn is an author to start with

We share the admiration for Isaac Asimov. May I suggest reading some of the works of Noam Chomsky. I´m sure you have heard of him

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Noam_Chomsky

"Hegemony or survival", that´s the question

What are you afraid of?

Haven´t seen any of your photography lately. Looking forward to it

Sincerely

Torgny

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Old Jul 8, 2007, 4:58 AM   #16
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Torgny wrote:
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Do you really think that a US car brand has more significance than the name of the revolutionary hero Che Guevara?
No, and that's not what I said.

There is no indication of the age of the graffiti, but if we presume it is recent,I am as likely to believe that a graffiti artist in a Turkish town would have intended to write 'CHEVY' as he would 'CHE' 38 years after the death of the iconic revolutionary. (Ernesto "Che" Guevara died October 9, 1967, and bahadir's photo was taken on February 18, 2006, hence 38 years.) The famous Alberto Korda photograph is one of the most ubiquitous, probably more so than Eddie Adams' photo of General Nguyen Ngoc Loan, but Che's legacy is fading. (Both photos were shot on Kodak Tri-X film, btw.)

But the major point I was trying to make is that both are equally insignificant to a 4 year old boy!He's not paying tribute to Che! He's tracing the letter 'H'! It just happens to have the letters 'C' and 'E' on either side.

I believe that some of us who may be somewhat familiar with the history (legend?)of 'Che', have been reading too much into this image, as interesting as it is in it's own right.

And if bahadir's son is indeed venerating the memory of Che Guevara, I'm certain bahadir will say so, and then I will apologize.
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Old Jul 8, 2007, 10:40 AM   #17
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Without delving into the political and moral aspects of Che Guevara - and I'm sure the popular viewpoint differs from place to place - TCav's posts bring to mind a rhyme known in Argentina:

"Tengo una remera del Che y no sé por qué," or "I have a Che T-shirt and I don't know why." (cut and paste from an article online)

Torgny, if you were to espouse TCav's theory that "Che" was perhaps ultimately supposed to read "Chevy", this photo still has impact. Chevy was the stereotypical American car brand once, delivering both "cheap" cars and large cars with large horsepower at a time when few Americans even knew the term "fuel economy", when a gallon of gasoline was just 25 cents... European vehicles were, for the most part, considered small, slower machines that only an eccentric would drive (in America), or perhaps a wealthy person who went upscale (Mercedes). An incomplete "Chevy" as grafitti in another country, unfamiliar letters being traced by an unknowing youg boy, could speak volumes of what has happened with the American icon, and, by extension, America herself.

Anyway, it can be fun to speculate, fantasize, project...

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Old Jul 8, 2007, 11:48 AM   #18
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TCav,

That´s totally pointless. You are trying to kick in doors that already are open.

Of course the little boy has no knowledge/understanding about the real Che Guevara (like for instance a little child has no knowledge/understanding of Christ at the time of an early baptism)

It is a matter of conviction, of what is ethically desireable for the future

Strange thing; if you, like Che, have the courage to question the foreign policy of the super power, the one that has done/does so much harm in the world, it is considered "political" in any context, whereas it is OK to post pictures of the stars and stripes, for many the symbol of imperialism and oppression and even . . . . . . .

Che Guevara stands for solidarity, the right for smaller countries to form their own destinies. Latin America is now forming an alliance to protect their interests against multinational corporations

The photo of the little boy brings hope for the future. El pueblo unido, jamás será vencido, El pueblo unido, jamás será vencido

So what are you afraid of, TCav, that the young in the world would strive for a new human being and a new world based upon solidarity and altruism

This is a significant photograph in many aspects or the word

Let´s see now if I get banned from this site with so many great photographers and so many virtual friends from all countries of the world

Torgny




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Old Jul 8, 2007, 12:24 PM   #19
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Torgny, I appreciate your observation regarding the face expression, body languageand above all your good wish about his future, especially ina time when we complain about young people becoming skin-deep! (But who should we blameother than their parents who never read at allexcept boulevard papers while advising their kids to do their homeworks and to read ??; )



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clem, it's a fact that we often like what we know, and therefore, the context becomes really important. Thanks for your appreciation : )




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Old Jul 8, 2007, 12:24 PM   #20
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TCav wrote:
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This is an interesting photo of a small boy tracing some letters on a wall with his finger.

THAT DOES NOT MAKE HIM A FUTURE REVOLUTIONARY!!!
Maybe not but being observant and some sense of sensitivity is a good start I belive

As for the Chevy scenerio, I am afraid it the most implausible thing to happen around here, except in one's wildest imagination or in some advertisementone can see on TV as passtimewhile awaiting the rest of the film:Ah!sth like:Some kids writes Levis on the wall and thepolicechase them!!! After all graffiti is a protest art...
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There is no indication of the age of the graffiti, but if we presume it is recent,I am as likely to believe that a graffiti artist in a Turkish town would have intended to write 'CHEVY' as he would 'CHE' 38 years after the death of the iconic revolutionary. (Ernesto "Che" Guevara died October 9, 1967, and bahadir's photo was taken on February 18, 2006, hence 38 years.)
Btw, as you know, Che did not die, he was killed! Anyway, we're not speaking about some fictive hero likeCaptain America, but a real one. 40 years could be a longtime inpersonal history but not in terms of History.Thus, even in a world where societies are becoming lonely crowds, as long as people read and think,Che's legacy will survive...

I don't thinkmine is only a fair assumption for someone whocreated thewell known quotation:

"Be a realist; demand the impossible" - Che Guevara

Thanks for your interest : )
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