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-   -   Looking for help with moving subjects (https://forums.steves-digicams.com/photo-critiques-83/looking-help-moving-subjects-69565/)

DigitalCop Oct 19, 2005 8:33 PM

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This shot is one of a series that I took this past weekend. I was shooting outside with very overcast skies. Though the shot cracks me up, I am looking more for advice on a few elements of motion photography moreso than on composition.

I used the action mode on my EOS 20D with a hand-me-down lens from an EOS Elan 35mm. This image has had the contrast enhanced and was converted to BW in Photoshop becuase the colors were dismal.

To me, this photo lacks clarity, contrast, and focus... all of which were common elements of the series of photos that I took. At times, a portion of the photo would be in good focus, while the rest was out of focus.

Is this a problem with the photographer, camera settings, or lens in your opinion?

Specific advice on camera settings / lighting / lens selection (what I should buy) would be appreciated. Though I take mostly still shots, I also would like to learn the basics of a quality motion shot.

Thanks in advance for your help.

Todd

Hards80 Oct 20, 2005 12:04 AM

for action you want a fast lens.. which means it will have a large aperture.. so it will have a smaller number... so a 2.8 lens is faster than a 5.6..

a good starting action lens is a 70-200 2.8.. sigma makes them, canon makes them.. both are good, but the sigma is considerably cheaper..

good technique involves practice.. so you must practice panning with your subjects and following through after you depress the shutter.. so keep swinging even after you take the shot.. .shooting in continuous mode and snapping off a few shots will help you get more keepers as one of them will probably be sharp..

get away from the "Scene" modes and learn to use your Av and Tv properly.. Av is my favorite as it allows you to adjust your aperture and thus your depth of field.. usuallly in action if you want to stop motion, then choose a relatively open (Small number) aperture to keep your shutter speeds high enough.. you may need to bump your ISO to get your shutter speeds where you want them... a good rule of thumb in action about the speed of running and such is 1/500..

(any sports shooters out there please feel free to jump in here and help me out if i missed something)

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dustin

www.hardwickphotos.com


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