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Old Dec 24, 2006, 10:29 AM   #1
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Shooting towards alow winter sun causes intense bright spots and dark shadows. Would a filter help? Less exposure?


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Old Dec 24, 2006, 10:43 AM   #2
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[align=left]Nice try Gene T. I like the shot as it is. I say just leave alone. Sometimes the low winter sun helps to make the shot. Creating nice shadows and bright sun spots.



Neil....




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Old Dec 24, 2006, 12:33 PM   #3
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Gene T

This is a very good shot for the conditions, there is a technique usually referred to as HDR (high dynamic range) which would involve compositing two identical compositions but one exposed for the shadows and the other for the highlights. A search may turn up some tutorials on the process.

Ira

http://www.aicphotography.blogspot.com/
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Old Dec 24, 2006, 1:00 PM   #4
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Gene T, nice shot..... I really like the way the path leads you into the shot!!! Ira is right with the technique for shooting in such conditions.Just a point to add to this I would vary the shutter speed rather then aperture as if you do change the aperture then you will affect the dof (depth of field) then you might not be able to match them up correctly. If possible always use a tripod for this technique as even a slight amount of movement can make it more touch to put the 2 shots together.

I hope you don't mind but here is a quick edit which pretty much gets rid of the problem without losing the feel of the original. Don't forget PP (post processing) is part of digital photography so always use it to your advantage. Some people are afraid that doing so takes away from the skill of the photographer but if it makes a good shot into a great one then it is worth doing. Also playing around with PP allows a photographer to learn what works better so that when shooting in the field small changes can be made to improve the originals thus less PP is needed.

Happy shooting and have a great Christmas!!!

Mark
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Old Dec 24, 2006, 1:35 PM   #5
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Gene and Mark

I always get a kick out of people who say things like "Post processing isn't real photography, it is just manipulating bad images.". Well, I guess that means that Ansel Adams was just a hack photographer who played with bad negatives in the darkroom, how absurd. Good photo printers like Ansel Adams used all sorts of tricks such as dodging, burning, masking, changing paper contrast grades, filtering and many many others. How are these any different from using Photoshop to enhance an image. We are not talking about fixing one head on another body here, it is not an attempt to deceive, it is just using old fashioned techniques in a new medium to help the photographer perfect his/her vision of what the image should be. Does a painter feel that he is cheating his art if he paints over parts of his work in progress becuase he wants to "improve" them, is a writer not allowed to revise and edit?

Great job Mark, Gene's image now has a richness that is not possible just with the out-of-camera exposure.

Ira
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Old Dec 24, 2006, 1:43 PM   #6
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Ira very true. Some of the best photographic work has hours put into it. Have a look at this guy he is only 16 and uses PP ina lot of his work to get fantastic results http://www.joeyl.com/Joey%20Lawrence%20Photography.htmlif only I could get close at 31 years old lol.




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Old Dec 24, 2006, 1:54 PM   #7
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Very impressive work, I hope things pan out for him. I wish I had that skill level at 51!!!

Ira

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Old Dec 25, 2006, 11:08 AM   #8
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Wow, After looking at those shots, It makes me want to hang up the camera:? (not really:blah

Very impressive, best of luck to him

In my younger days I proceesed my own B&W in a darkroom I had set up in the bathroom. Most of the things I do during PP now are the same as then except I get instant feedback instead of waiting for the print to develope.So in that respect it saves money, time and no bad chemical smell:lol:

Merry Christmas all

Mugmar

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Old Dec 25, 2006, 5:48 PM   #9
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Mark - I liked the shot as first posted, but your pp really adds to it. I'm trying to figure out what you did, I think you upped the saturation, but did you do anything else?
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Old Dec 25, 2006, 6:20 PM   #10
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Yep, upped saturation a little, changed colour temp making it warmer and then as usual a little unsharp mask. Apart from that nothing was needed as it was well exposed and good subject choice.
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