Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Post Your Photos > Photo Critiques

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Apr 9, 2007, 9:57 AM   #11
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 2
Default

Thanks everyone...
Some great info.
(yes this is garjowan, I am having problems with my account and had to re-join)
This wasn't a staged shot, so I didn't really think much about DOF or framing... HE was coming into the room, I was 3 feet away and playing with the new camera... He loves cameras as was just watching me, so I snapped off a few and just loved the look on his face...LOL

Ken, I will try that out today and see what happens... 60 seconds for you... one hour for me...LOL!!!

Thanks,
Gary
garjo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 9, 2007, 1:11 PM   #12
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 1,427
Default

Sometimes it is easer to blur the background, as was said, it is difficult to cut out a person ifhe or she has fine hairsticking up it takes a lot of time, I just done a quick cut out and added a split tone effect which gives a B/W effect,on softlight blend mode, then sharpened the eyes.
alex james is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 9, 2007, 1:13 PM   #13
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 1,427
Default

sorry here is the photo.
Attached Images
 
alex james is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 9, 2007, 3:59 PM   #14
Senior Member
 
Corpsy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 879
Default

It's not impossible to isolate him from the background, but it isn't easy either. I'll give you a step by step of how you can accomplish it. This took me about 15 minutes, but if you haven't done this kind of thing before and if you really want to do a good job, it can take considerably longer. Often with this kind of work it can be a good idea to make multiple attempts from scratch, each time attacking it with everything you learned from your last mistakes.

To do this right, you really need to be comfortable using multiple layers. I also recommend that you learn how to use layer masks. There's only one step here where it's necessary and you can use the eraser for a lot of these steps, but I used masks throughout.

The first step was to duplicate the layer, make one layer invisible, then on the other layer make a selection, cutting below the loose hairs. I did mine using the path tool and applying it as a vector mask, but any kind of selection should be fine. If you want, you can get very detailed with your selection along the hair and try to ratain the edges of the hairs. I made mine very simple for the sake of getting it done quickly.





Go back to your untouched layer, making it visible and the rest invisible. Select the area around the lose hairs. I used my first selection, then expanded it around the hairs. Copy and paste that into a new layer and make the other layers invisible.

Next, under "select" choose the "Color Range" tool. With fuzziness set to about 10, I used the eye dropper and clicked on the dark brown patch of hair, then shift clicked on a lighter patch. This gets a good range of hair selected. Increase the fuzziness until you get a good selection of the hairs that are sticking up with not much background selected. Hit OK. Copy and paste the selection onto a new layer and make the other layers invisible.






A pretty cool effect in it's own right. You'll want to add a white layer underneath to make it easier to work on.

Next, I went in and erased some of the excess background. You can use the eraser, but I chose to create a layer mask and paint it with black. This way, I can always paint back in any details I remove.

I then use a smaller brush with a low flow to remove finer bits of detail between the hairs. Be sure to paint with the flows of the hair. It helps if you make a duplicate layer to work on every time you make good progress.

Because I had to erase some hair detail with the background, I then used a very fine brush to paint hairs back in by sampling the hair color and using the paint brush.

Finally, I add hue/saturation adjustment layer. Set it to colorize, then adjust the hue so the hair color appears accurate. Hit OK. Select the adjustment layer's layer mask and invert it to make it black, disabling the effect. Then use a big, soft white brush to paint into the layer mask, painting over the areas where there are still bits of background color.





Now, turn the originally selected layer back on.





It's not perfect, but with some touching up it can look quite convincing.





It's best to try and keep the background similar to what it was originally. Since the original was against a light background, putting it against something dark will tend to look less natural and bring out imperfections in your edits. If I had to use a dark background though, I'd probably go in and add some highlights and shadows in the hair to make it look a bit less flat.

Good luck!
Corpsy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 9, 2007, 4:42 PM   #15
Senior Member
 
kenmck15's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 2,568
Default

Indeed there are multiple ways to isolate your subject.

Indeed i would use a channels pallet and fiddle with levels to generate an accurate selection as outlineed above.

Indeed these more drastic mods tend to look very unnatural and ppls eyes are often drawn to the imperfections in the cropping rather than the subject. Feathering and burning of edges are really needeed also to try to get away from the whole cardboard cut out look and give the subject a sense of depth. Again much more intricate stuff.

Also as mentioned by Corpsy, its best to keep the backing close to the orig. Simple bluring and feathering will give you a more natural and authentic feel, as long as you dont take the blurring overboard the blend should be fairly seemless.

In all examples shown i still feel the softened backing gives the shot.

ken
kenmck15 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 9, 2007, 6:40 PM   #16
Member
 
garjowan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 97
Default

Some great stuff to work on a play with here....THANK YOU!

I have gone a tried out Ken's way earlier and I must say... It is very simple and it came out pretty good.
I will post it when I get home from work... I played with USM and sharpened and adjusted the color of his eyes a bit... I didn't realize that the colors would changed so much with USM...LOL!!! (LEARNING)

I printed out an 8X10 crop of it and it looks great... Atleast to me...LOL!!!

Thanks everyone for the tips... I will practice all of them, I really appreciate it.

Still practicing,
Gary
garjowan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 9, 2007, 7:40 PM   #17
Senior Member
 
kenmck15's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 2,568
Default

garjowan wrote:
Quote:
Some great stuff to work on a play with here....THANK YOU!

I have gone a tried out Ken's way earlier and I must say... It is very simple and it came out pretty good.
I will post it when I get home from work... I played with USM and sharpened and adjusted the color of his eyes a bit... I didn't realize that the colors would changed so much with USM...LOL!!! (LEARNING)

I printed out an 8X10 crop of it and it looks great... Atleast to me...LOL!!!

Thanks everyone for the tips... I will practice all of them, I really appreciate it.

Still practicing,
Gary

Thats great its working out for you. Its all in the feathering really. Helps keep those fine details. Once you get used to it you nkow your margins of error and hey if some areas are a bit sharper than they are meant to be simply omm in and grab the freehand blur tool and touch up.

If you want to further enhance, while the backing is selected and feathered, go into levels and pull in the mids a tad to darken it off a bit to add a bit more emphisis on your subject. all trial and error really until you find a combination that works quickly.

Its a pain spending too mch time doing fiddley edits

indeed usm makes a huge difference. on my edit i ran through an unsharp @ the following

200% @ pixel 0.3

and then again @ 10%, pixel: 250, this gives the image a nice contrast change. I learnt this from another user here and it works great for me.

ken

kenmck15 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 9, 2007, 11:54 PM   #18
Member
 
garjowan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 97
Default

Here is a cropped 4X6 at 150PPI...

I know I still need practice, but I think I got the idea...
His left shoulder area needs some work, but this was some great info for once I site him down to do a real portrait.


Now that damn reflection in his eyes is driving me nuts...LOL!!!


Thanks again! :G

Keeps on practicing
Gary

Attached Images
 
garjowan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 10, 2007, 12:26 AM   #19
Member
 
garjowan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 97
Default

Just one more from that little "shoot"

















































Hey Dad... Are you sure that was apple juice?

Attached Images
 
garjowan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Apr 10, 2007, 12:29 AM   #20
Senior Member
 
kenmck15's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 2,568
Default

garjowan wrote:
Quote:
Here is a cropped 4X6 at 150PPI...

I know I still need practice, but I think I got the idea...
His left shoulder area needs some work, but this was some great info for once I site him down to do a real portrait.


Now that darn reflection in his eyes is driving me nuts...LOL!!!


Thanks again! :G

Keeps on practicing
Gary
looks good. the feathering seems to give a nice roll off like a natrual lo fstop lens would. looks very good. i like th warm tone of the skin and the overall shot.

very pleasing to the eye.

im not sure to wat degree you want to back off catch light in the eyes. personally i ifnd it quite natural and i htink it draws the eye in nicely.

just to show one way of doing this. duplicate layer, i just zoomed in close and use d the burn tool. set the diameter to the same size as pupil and put onto mid tones and set to 100%. just a quick note, a fast wayto resize the burn tool is to press the "[" and "]" keys to increase/descrease. then i just keep clicking the mouse until i got the right level on each eye. Personaly i just kept going until most of the eye was almost black. then i use the layer opacity setting to bring in a bit of catch light to make it look more real. you be the judge on how much you want. then all done

ken





you can ta
Attached Images
 
kenmck15 is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 5:49 PM.