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Old Jul 30, 2007, 2:47 PM   #1
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This picture was shot on my Olympus SP-350 using SHQ (Super High Quality) + an Automatic setting + Landscape Scene.

Here are the statistics for the JPG Image:
Original date/time: 2007:07:29 10:24:08
Exposure time: 1/60
F-stop: 2.8
ISO speed: 50
Focal length: 8.0000
Flash: Not fired
Exposure mode: Auto
White balance: Auto
Orientation: Top-left
Light source: Unknown
Exposure bias: 0.0000
Metering mode: Pattern
Exposure program: Creative
Digitized date/time: 2007:07:29 10:24:08
Modified date/time: 2007:07:29 10:24:08
Image description: OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Scene type: Photograph
User comment:
Custom rendered: Normal
Scene capture type: Landscape
Gain control: None
Digital zoom ratio: 0.0000
Contrast: Normal
Saturation: Normal
Sharpness: Normal
Olympus special mode: 0,0,0
Olympus jpeg quality: 1
Olympus macro mode: 0
Olympus (unknown 1): 0
Olympus digital zoom: 1.0000
Olympus (unknown 2): 9.0950
Olympus (unknown 3): 65324,65044,64935,65383,65151,65063
Olympus firmware ver: SX855
Olympus picture info: [pictureInfo] Resolution=1 [Camera Info] Type=SX855
Olympus camera ID: "OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA" (snip)
Olympus more data: (snip)
Camera make: OLYMPUS IMAGING CORP.
Camera model: SP350
X resolution: 72.0000
Y resolution: 72.0000
Resolution unit: Inches
Camera version: Version 1.4
Colorspace: sRGB
File source: DSC

Before I did that, however, I shot the image using Olympus' RAW settings for highest resolution etc. I can't display the RAW image because I haven't settled on which RAW Converter I want to use (the Thumbs Plus plug in does not support the Olympus SP-350 sigh).

Here are the statistics for the RAW Image:
Original date/time: 2007:07:29 10:08:37
Exposure time: 1/30
F-stop: 2.8
ISO speed: 56
Focal length: 8.0000
Flash: Not fired
Exposure mode: Auto
White balance: Auto
Orientation: Top-left
Light source: Unknown
Exposure bias: 0.0000
Metering mode: Pattern
Exposure program: Normal
Digitized date/time: 2007:07:29 10:08:37
Modified date/time: 2007:07:29 10:08:37
Image description: OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Scene type: Photograph
User comment:
Custom rendered: Normal
Scene capture type: Standard
Gain control: Low gain up
Digital zoom ratio: 0.0000
Contrast: Normal
Saturation: Normal
Sharpness: Normal
Olympus special mode: 2007669128,2007669128,2007669128
Olympus jpeg quality: 6
Olympus macro mode: 0
Olympus (unknown 1): 0
Olympus digital zoom: 1.0000
Olympus (unknown 2): 1.0000
Olympus (unknown 3): 39304,30634,39304,30634,39304,30634
Olympus firmware ver: (snip)
Olympus picture info: (snip)
Olympus camera ID: (snip)
Olympus more data: (snip)
Camera make: OLYMPUS IMAGING CORP.
Camera model: SP350
X resolution: 72.0000
Y resolution: 72.0000
Resolution unit: Inches
Camera version: Version 1.4
Colorspace: sRGB
File source: DSC

This shot is just so washed out, I really feel I need some guidance on how to shoot it.
I'd like to bring the shade of the background trees into focus, and (if you'll look closely) you'll see my orange power cord lying there -- I should be able to see that much more vividly. It's not sharp enough. In short . . . this shot is pretty bad lol.

I'm not a photographer but I am darn proud I cut down this gigantic tree by myself and I'd like to have photos of it (I also want help with a PANORAMA shot from the inside of my house to get the full length of this beast . . . but that's another thread).

Thanks for every piece of advice you can give me. I am clueless about what I'm doing here!

:|
MISS CHIEVOUS


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http://www.intergate.com/~tobeornot2b/me/P7290011.JPG


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Old Jul 31, 2007, 12:00 PM   #2
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There is just too much dynamic range in the photo for your camera. Any camera with a small sensor would be in the same boat and even a DSLR using raw might have a little problem. The ratio of very bright to dark objects is just too much for the camera to capture properly.

I notice you have your contrast set to normal for the JPG. You get a little more dynamic range if you turn that all the way down in the menu. Of course you get your best dynamic range processing the raw image, but you are back to square one if you increase the contrast.

The "approved" technique is to meter for the highlights and then bring the shadow detail up in an image editor. That usually results in noise in the shadows. In the case of the photo you posted I would probably find a better angle without anything directly lighted by the sun in the frame. The bug zapper adds depth to the photo and in an artistic sense is the right framing. But you have to bow to the limitations of your sensor.

If you are using iESP focus you have to be aware of what it is focusing on. I usually use center or spot focus and pre-focus on what I want sharp. Little sensors have a lot of depth of focus, but at f2.8 you can get things that are not completely sharp if it focuses in the wrong place. If you put the camera on a tripod you could use aperture priority and stop down for greater DOF.

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Old Jul 31, 2007, 4:18 PM   #3
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The photo seems to be way overexposed 1/30 sec at f2.8 and yet the Iexif

says it's on auto,allow time for the camera to adjust it's exposure settings by

only pressing the shutter release button down half way, wait until the camera has

focused on the scene and indicates that it's ready, then press the button down the

rest of the way to take the photo.....................musket.

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Old Aug 1, 2007, 12:22 PM   #4
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slipe wrote:
Quote:
I notice you have your contrast set to normal for the JPG. You get a little more dynamic range if you turn that all the way down in the menu. Of course you get your best dynamic range processing the raw image, but you are back to square one if you increase the contrast.

The "approved" technique is to meter for the highlights and then bring the shadow detail up in an image editor. That usually results in noise in the shadows. In the case of the photo you posted I would probably find a better angle without anything directly lighted by the sun in the frame.

If you are using iESP focus you have to be aware of what it is focusing on. I usually use center or spot focus and pre-focus on what I want sharp. Little sensors have a lot of depth of focus, but at f2.8 you can get things that are not completely sharp if it focuses in the wrong place. If you put the camera on a tripod you could use aperture priority and stop down for greater DOF.
Snipe . . . thank you for the feedback! I've had an opportunity to study the Advanced PDF for my camera and I'm slowly getting comfortable with some of these terms. I've hilited the points I'm responding to in red.

My objective here is to not only pull the trees in the shadows out but to get them as sharp as I can make them; so when you say:arrow: "you're back to square one" please explain what you mean? Or am I confusing contrast with sharpness?

By:arrow: "meter for the hilights" I assume we're referring to the histogram chart on my camera? Any tips on what this ideal . . . er . . . mountain range should be looking like for a compound lighting situation such as this? Or is histogram something that you can't accurately refer to in such a one-dimensional way?

:arrow: "iESP focus" defined by my manual: "The camera determines which subject within the screen to focus on. Even when the subject is not in the center of the screen, focusing is possible." And directly below it
———————————————— ————————————————
"SPOT" = "Focus selection is based on the subject within the AF target mark."
———————————————— ————————————————
"AREA" = "Move the AF target mark to select the area you want to focus on to take a picture."

I get the iESP; but the SPOT and AREA are beyond me lol. What is meant by AF target mark? Am I supposed to see a grid on my viewfinder (I don't)?

By:arrow: "step down for greater DOF" I'm sorry but I don't know what this means. Step down? Reduce the F-whatever? DOF means . . . ?

Bless you for helping me with this! The darn thing is dying on me so I have got to get about the business of this soon tsk.

MC

musket wrote:
Quote:
The photo seems to be way overexposed 1/30 sec at f2.8 and yet the Iexif

says it's on auto,allow time for the camera to adjust it's exposure settings by

only pressing the shutter release button down half way, wait until the camera has

focused on the scene and indicates that it's ready, then press the button down the

rest of the way to take the photo.....................musket.
Musket . . . thank you for responding! and yes, I do not doubt that I didn't wait for the thing to properly focus. Nonetheless, this is the kind of technical stuff I really need to hear. :arrow: What do the 1/30 numbers mean and what relationship do they have to the F2.8 setting? In a compound lighting situation such as this, is there an ideal combination of number strings I should be striving to achieve?

Thank you guys! And hey -- I'm sorry the damn photo is so big it throws the whole thread off. I'm removing it and inserting just the link to the picture so the thread isn't three feet wide ha ha. Ah well, we all have to start somewhere lol.

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Old Aug 1, 2007, 1:46 PM   #5
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I put your pic up again resized :-)


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Old Aug 1, 2007, 2:20 PM   #6
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There's a large vocabulary of abreviations that goes along with

photography :-)and if your very new to it, it can be very daunting

http://acronyms.thefreedictionary.co...al+photography:-)

http://www.luminous-landscape.com/tu...stograms.shtml

I think the above scene is a hard one to get right without PP (post processing)

as there is a very large dynamic range in it, if you metered on the brightest

part of the scene ie focused and set the exposure by pessing the shutter

release button half way down on the brightest area of the scene and holding

the button half way down then panning the camera to include the rest of the scene

and then pressing the button all the way down that might take care of very bright

highlights but the rest of the scene might be dark so thats where PP (post processing)

is needed to brighten up the dark areas later when you load the

photo onto the PC.............hope that helps a little.......:|.....musket



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