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Old Sep 26, 2007, 11:30 AM   #1
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A couple of shots I took in my spare time.

Experimented with different lighting conditions.

Please give me your C & C and also advice or ideas so I can advance my knowledge.

Taken using:

Canon EOS 400D / Rebel XTi

Sigma 17-70mm f/2.8-4.5 DC Macro

Lighting using normal "yellow" table reading lamp without light tent.

*please view EXIF for other info
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Old Sep 26, 2007, 11:32 AM   #2
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2nd pic using same conditions + PP with CS2 (sharpening & auto levels)-still new to photoshop.
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Old Sep 26, 2007, 11:34 AM   #3
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3rd from the series.

Direct lighting from table lamp + PP with CS2 (sharpening only)
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Old Sep 29, 2007, 6:18 PM   #4
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just take out coulr cast with curves or what ever you like



Ken
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Old Sep 29, 2007, 6:26 PM   #5
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Hi there Hazmy,

Interesting subjects, I like them! Good original ideas and subjects.

About your actual photos, good on you for experimenting, that's how we all learn!

I like the first 2 photos the best. 3rd photo loses my interest as the "feet" / base is cropped off. I like the very different style of figurines (between 1st and 2nd photo). I'd also like to have seen a "portrait" orientation on "a couple" i.e. two of two each of the first type of figurines, to get closer / see more detail, etc. Not that I don't like the "group photo" (first photo)... but just to add to it!

I think you should have increased the depth of field by choosing a bit of a higher aperture setting (you chose f7.1) but I feel maybe you should have chosen f11, because it seems the left figurines in both photos are starting to be out of the depth of field... noticable particularly for me in the eyelashes of the left figurine in the 2nd photo.

Experimenting with lighting is quite an involved process... I like how you've chosen a white background and the shadows add to the natural feel of the photos. However there is a different hue to the "white" in each photo (slightly blue "cool" in the first, the second seems a bit "green" and the last is reddish "warm") - which in my opinion makes them lose their uniformity.

Please share how you did the white background (on paper / white wall?) Thanks for sharing. I hope you show us more and keep learning! Well done!

Paul

Edit: Ken did his edit while I was typing my reply. Looks better like this, well done mate!

And yes, the glare of the light on the purple figurine's hat is a bit bright, don't know if you could get rid of that by a slightly softer light source or light source being further away / slight change in angle / composition.
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Old Sep 30, 2007, 2:52 AM   #6
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hye kenmck15 & pj1974,

thanks for your replies, comments and suggestions.

To Ken: not really sure how to use curves. still learning by trial and error. still a very newbie to post processing. but will try as soon as i find the time. Maybe you can like give me some pointers or tips on that?

To Paul: The "group" photo was taken in this form because the actual size of a single figurine is so small that I couldn't get in close enough. The lens I'm usng is not a true Macro lens and quite a cheapie that quality is compromised. (newbie..no money for better lens..hahah..)

Anyway FYI Paul, the background was using standard "white" A4 sized paper. Lighting was using a yellow table reading lamp.

The different hue in all the pictures i think is because I used "Auto Levels" in CS2 so it came out differently (still learning how to PP)



Anyway, I still experimenting and will try to add both your ideas and tips to my next series. Coming soon I hope.

Thanks again and hope to hear from you soon.
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Old Sep 30, 2007, 5:13 AM   #7
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Hi

When using any type of tungsten lighting (Std lighting from lamps etc) you will get strong yellow colour casting which is a bit of a mission to combat. Bcse you are using a white backing it makes it very easy to sample.



You can see the shot below where i have opened the curves dialogue box. Pretty much select the eye dropper in the curves box which says "set white point". then go into your image and select a point which in the image which should be bright white. In this case it will be the brightest yellowy spot in the backing bcse i believethis is meant to be a whitecard. YOu can make this selection anywhere in teh image.


These same eye dropper tools work in the levels dialogue box also.


THe reason you set this as the brightest is bcse ps will set this as white and will generally blow out anything above the value of that in which you clikced on.

Ken



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Old Sep 30, 2007, 5:15 AM   #8
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Then here is what i got when i clicked where the "X" is.

a 2 sec job. Again this is only a single step you can do so much more if you wanted to.

Also this is only 1 of many ways to get rid of the cast. You can also set blck points and neutral points also using the eye droppers to get the colour more accurate again.

Bcse you are using a white bright backing this simple and quick technique should get you well on the road to a correct image.

Ken
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Old Sep 30, 2007, 10:24 AM   #9
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Hazmy,

Thanks for explaining about your "setup" and so on. From what I've heard your lens (the Sigma 17-70mm) is quite a decent one as a "zoom macro" without being an actual 1:1 "purpose built macro". I mean, it serves good as a general walk around lens and has better than most close focusing ability... I usually use my 28-135mm Canon lens for my flower / insect / macro photos... it won't focus as close or produce as "magnified" images as your lens will, however I still find it does good enough for my various needs at the moment. Here is one example of a recent macro of mine: http://forums.steves-digicams.com/fo...amp;forum_id=7

Ken,

It's great you could provide some of your very well documented (as usual) helpful tips on how to do things... it's fantastic you spend time and effort to demonstrate such things...!

By the way, here is a link to a YouTube video which shows some basics of how to use curves. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ORM6AZY19pw I learned some basics in the beginning from a similar "over the net" feed, andI am still learning more about curves all the time!

Regards,

Paul


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Old Sep 30, 2007, 2:55 PM   #10
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wow...

Ken:

Thanks for the effort to show me about this curves and levels thing. very2 informative and be sure to use it the next time I post process. In fact I've already tried it out after reading ur tips and starting to understand how it works.. should be ok with it soon (I hope)

Paul:

You're right about that lens though.. It's a very nice lens to use (comparitively for it's price range / built quality and pic taking quality)

Guess what, I just experimented abit shooting with this lens and found out that the lack of sharpness might be because of the UV filter I have on it. I noticed something on the filter and took it of. Then I just decided to shap some pics without the filter and .... the end result is so much clearer. Also I noticed the AF slightly faster without the filter.

Maybe I gonna start switching to shooting without a UV filter.. hahah..

Anyway.. thanx for your comments guys.. very constructive and educational.
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