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Old May 25, 2008, 2:15 PM   #11
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Reanimator wrote:
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just noticed that you actualy mention the make of the lens in this thread

if this is what your using all the time on long shots, in other messages too, then thats where your problem with sharpness etc is, i did a search because i had not heard of "phoenix lens" and im affraid to say you get what you pay for with a lens.

as you say your having probs no matter what you try

id go for a proper brand lens for your camera, i know itll be more expensive, but this is because the optics will be miles better

Gary
[align=center]Thank you Gary, that pretty much confirms what I was I was starting to believe.[/align] [align=center]I guess I'm going to have to have a little talk with the camera shop where I bought it from.[/align] [align=center]I was relying on his knowledge and experience to guide me…:sad:[/align]
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Old May 25, 2008, 2:57 PM   #12
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This is more for anyone asking questions which really shouldnt be answered. Asking what settings to use is a bit silly since you are in the situation and not us. All the different kinds of light, shade, bright sunlight, overcast, partially cloudy, rain, snow, sleet and hail. My advice to you is to spend a day from morning to sundown and shoot the same scene over and over under all the different lighting conditions. Get to know your camera before we do. Then come back and ask some good questions which can easily be answered. This is the age of digital so taking pictures all day and seeing instant results will cost nothing but the time spent and it will be time well spent. I recommend this to anyone new to photography or having a new camera. Learn its limitations and what to expect and stay in that boundary so there is no disappointment. As a final note, anyone serious about their photos should learn photoshop because 99% of all bad pics can be fixed to some degree.
Well Bynx… I guess you just proved my dad wrong, he once said to me, "there is no such thing as a silly question, how else are you going to learn?" :lol::lol::lol: you're right, after thinking about it, it does sound kind of silly without more information to go along with it. I really didn't couch my inquiry very well to start with.
Fortunately for me I got the answers I needed anyway. I did go out with my camera for several days and took literally 1000's of pictures to get the feel of my camera. When I was younger, I could pick up on new technology like a wiz, now my brain is a little sluggish.:angry: Oh well, perhaps with the help of this forum and the vast amount of knowledge here I'll be able to grasp it eventually. I do have Photoshop CS3 and I'm getting better and better with it as I use it, although I'd prefer to get the best I can from the camera so little post work has to be done.
thank you Bynx; I appreciate your input,
-John

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Old May 25, 2008, 3:13 PM   #13
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Goldwinger wrote:
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Bynx wrote:
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This is more for anyone asking questions which really shouldnt be answered. Asking what settings to use is a bit silly since you are in the situation and not us. All the different kinds of light, shade, bright sunlight, overcast, partially cloudy, rain, snow, sleet and hail. My advice to you is to spend a day from morning to sundown and shoot the same scene over and over under all the different lighting conditions. Get to know your camera before we do. Then come back and ask some good questions which can easily be answered. This is the age of digital so taking pictures all day and seeing instant results will cost nothing but the time spent and it will be time well spent. I recommend this to anyone new to photography or having a new camera. Learn its limitations and what to expect and stay in that boundary so there is no disappointment. As a final note, anyone serious about their photos should learn photoshop because 99% of all bad pics can be fixed to some degree.
Well Bynx… I guess you just proved my dad wrong, he once said to me, "there is no such thing as a silly question, how else are you going to learn?" :lol::lol::lol: you're right, after thinking about it, it does sound kind of silly without more information to go along with it. I really didn't couch my inquiry very well to start with.
Fortunately for me I got the answers I needed anyway. I did go out with my camera for several days and took literally 1000's of pictures to get the feel of my camera. When I was younger, I could pick up on new technology like a wiz, now my brain is a little sluggish.:angry: Oh well, perhaps with the help of this forum and the vast amount of knowledge here I'll be able to grasp it eventually. I do have Photoshop CS3 and I'm getting better and better with it as I use it, although I'd prefer to get the best I can from the camera so little post work has to be done.
thank you Bynx; I appreciate your input,
-John

I agree on the part that a querstion is good to ask how silly it might be. Perhaps at that moment you don't know...then just ask. Why try something a 1000 times if someone else has 'invented' the wheel already?? That would be truly silly not?

If an expert or a more experienced person gives advice that equels many time saved.

I am trying different shots too at my home. like the flash...how can I flash an subject without much shadow..and make it look more natural...still trying. I do write down settings like angle of the flash...all they important settings etc...equpment used..so that i can review and fine tune a bit by bit...

But final saying: Ask if you don't know... I agree with your dad...there;s no such thing as stupid/silly questions...people should not judge other people like that... that aint right


By they way...at 500 mm ...you should really try to support onto something to lessen the shake or use mono / tri pod...that will make your pictures sharp.

I use the Tamron 200-500mm f/5-6.3 It does need more light to catch the same picture but this is what i can afford to buy. The only donwside is the slow auto focus.. really need to find a way to work around the slow AF. Maybe manual focussing...that i could try....

But John Welcome to the photography club!
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Old May 25, 2008, 3:25 PM   #14
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Something i remembered:

If a person looks left then place the subject closer to the right of the picture. vice versa.

SAme applies to cars, birds... looks more better that way...


So you did well...one of the things you learn about composition...
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Old May 25, 2008, 11:21 PM   #15
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feetjai wrote:
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Something i remembered:

If a person looks left then place the subject closer to the right of the picture. vice versa.

SAme applies to cars, birds... looks more better that way...


So you did well...one of the things you learn about composition...
thanks CW, I appriceiate the kind words.
I have been pricing lenses... looks like i need a little over $3000 to get what i need... oh well it's only money right?:lol:
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Old May 26, 2008, 3:12 AM   #16
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Goldwinger wrote:
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feetjai wrote:
Quote:

Something i remembered:

If a person looks left then place the subject closer to the right of the picture. vice versa.

SAme applies to cars, birds... looks more better that way...


So you did well...one of the things you learn about composition...
thanks CW, I appriceiate the kind words.
I have been pricing lenses... looks like i need a little over $3000 to get what i need... oh well it's only money right?:lol:

Ahh ok. Yes better lenses cost a lot more then a dime =)

From another forum thread , check the reviews from other users before you buy any lens. Some lenses are just much better althought the prize and looks are almost the same.

More zooms:

http://www.dyxum.com/lenses/results.asp?IDLensType=3

Primes:

http://www.dyxum.com/lenses/results.asp?IDLensType=1


Edit: post the lenses too that you want to buy and why... some lenses are just better for specific roles or can do better with a spicific photo job.
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Old May 26, 2008, 8:35 AM   #17
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Goldwinger wrote:
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In the photo below I used 1/90 f:8. The image is much sharper (better comp too?)But, way to dark! My biggest problem is I can't tell from the LCD view how well my settings will produce a photo. What looks good on screen, looks bad on the computer and vice versa.
Thanks,
John
The main reason for the increased sharpness, is the smaller aperture. Nearly all lenses are sharper a couple stops down from wide open (the so-called 'sweet spot'). The top of the line lenses will be sharper throughout their range, but cost many times more. For faster shutter speeds, you could increase your ISO sensitivity to 400 or 800. IIRC, the GX10 has good noise characteristics to 800, but at 1600 and above, the noise begins to get a little harsh.

Post-processing can restore a lot of the brightness to the shadow areas. Photoshop Elements has a shadows/highlights tool which would work wonders on your second picture. The first could do with some sharpening - also fairly easily done.

Whether to purchase a new lens, is of course, up to you, but I usually recommend that people spend some time learning to get the most out of what they have. Then, if they decide to upgrade equipment, the skills to use it have already been learned.

brian
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Old May 26, 2008, 10:31 AM   #18
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VTphotog wrote:
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Goldwinger wrote:
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snip
The main reason for the increased sharpness, is the smaller aperture. Nearly all lenses are sharper a couple stops down from wide open (the so-called 'sweet spot'). The top of the line lenses will be sharper throughout their range, but cost many times more. For faster shutter speeds, you could increase your ISO sensitivity to 400 or 800. IIRC, the GX10 has good noise characteristics to 800, but at 1600 and above, the noise begins to get a little harsh.

Post-processing can restore a lot of the brightness to the shadow areas. Photoshop Elements has a shadows/highlights tool which would work wonders on your second picture. The first could do with some sharpening - also fairly easily done.

Whether to purchase a new lens, is of course, up to you, but I usually recommend that people spend some time learning to get the most out of what they have. Then, if they decide to upgrade equipment, the skills to use it have already been learned.

brian
Thank you Brian,
That helps me a lot. But I do think I need a better lens. In the pic below, I shot this handheld but the lens was resting on top of a chain link fence with me on my tip toes. So it wasn't as steady as it could have been. The sun was bright with a few light wispy scattered clouds. It just seems to me that I should have gotten more detail than I did with the settings I used. (1/350 f:5.6 ISO 100)
I know my skills need lots of work:roll: but, if I have good tools to work with then I can only blame me because I know the tools are able to do what I ask of them...

is that a fair assumption?
Thanks again Brian,
-John

oh, yes it was windy that day.
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Old May 27, 2008, 10:54 AM   #19
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Goldwinger wrote:
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VTphotog wrote:
Quote:
Goldwinger wrote:
Quote:
snip
The main reason for the increased sharpness, is the smaller aperture. Nearly all lenses are sharper a couple stops down from wide open (the so-called 'sweet spot'). The top of the line lenses will be sharper throughout their range, but cost many times more. For faster shutter speeds, you could increase your ISO sensitivity to 400 or 800. IIRC, the GX10 has good noise characteristics to 800, but at 1600 and above, the noise begins to get a little harsh.

Post-processing can restore a lot of the brightness to the shadow areas. Photoshop Elements has a shadows/highlights tool which would work wonders on your second picture. The first could do with some sharpening - also fairly easily done.

Whether to purchase a new lens, is of course, up to you, but I usually recommend that people spend some time learning to get the most out of what they have. Then, if they decide to upgrade equipment, the skills to use it have already been learned.

brian
Thank you Brian,
That helps me a lot. But I do think I need a better lens. In the pic below, I shot this handheld but the lens was resting on top of a chain link fence with me on my tip toes. So it wasn't as steady as it could have been. The sun was bright with a few light wispy scattered clouds. It just seems to me that I should have gotten more detail than I did with the settings I used. (1/350 f:5.6 ISO 100)
I know my skills need lots of work:roll: but, if I have good tools to work with then I can only blame me because I know the tools are able to do what I ask of them...

is that a fair assumption?
Thanks again Brian,
-John

oh, yes it was windy that day.
Everyone do things according to what he/she can do at that specific moment. I don't 100% support the thought that with 'with good tools you can only blame myself..'

No need to think like that. just do what you want to do...just try your best...try to be creative. all with come as you keep shooting and keep thinking why.... is this picture like this...what i learned is : looking at other people 's pictures and the comments does give you very good info about 'how to'

So? did you make a list of the lenses you want and why you want them? Post them...
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Old May 27, 2008, 8:50 PM   #20
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feetjai wrote:
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So? did you make a list of the lenses you want and why you want them? Post them...
Thanks for the feedback CW,
No, I haven't really felt much like getting into it right now. I'm still beating myself up for spending $400 on a crappy lens. :angry: I don't think I'll be able to afford to get anything before next year and by then I'll know better what I want. In the meantime I'll have to suffer with what I have. You can believe that before I spend any more money I'll do a bunch more research!
Thanks again for all your help,
John

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