Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Post Your Photos > Photo Critiques

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Jun 13, 2008, 11:29 AM   #1
Junior Member
 
Mr Ranger's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 17
Default

I am a dog breeder and am trying to capture and produce images that will show my dogs in the best possible light. This photo is (in my novice opinion) what I would like to emulate.

Just purchased an Olympus 510 / 2 lens kit. I have with the help from several here been able to figure out how to blur the background, however my shots lack the crispness of this shot. My images look good, that is until I compare it to this one. Looking at the photocan you determine if the outcome isstrictly from the camera or has the image been enhanced to get the rich look? Any help would be appreciated.


Attached Images
 
Mr Ranger is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Jun 13, 2008, 2:47 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
musket's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 2,782
Default

Yes, well first of all post a photo that you have taken

size it tosimilar dimensions to the one above, include

exif on the photo, and then watch for any advice/tips

on shooting/editing. We all have to start somewhere,

first get a foot on the first rung of the ladder before assending

so to speak............:idea:.............musket.
musket is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 13, 2008, 7:15 PM   #3
Junior Member
 
Mr Ranger's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 17
Default

Musket, thanks for a second time today. I will do as you suggested as soon as I can, weather permitting of course (its raining). In the mean time without the exif is it possible to tell to what degree photo editing helped this shot?
Mr Ranger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 13, 2008, 8:28 PM   #4
Junior Member
 
Mr Ranger's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 17
Default



[Image]
Image Description = OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Make = OLYMPUS IMAGING CORP.
Model = E-510
Orientation = top/left
Software = Version 1.3
Date Time = 2008-06-12 16:01:19

[Camera]
Exposure Time = 1/200"
F Number = F5.4
Exposure Program = Aperture priority
ISO Speed Ratings = 100
Exif Version = Version 2.21
Date Time Original = 2008-06-12 16:01:19
Date Time Digitized = 2008-06-12 16:01:19
Exposure Bias Value = +0.7EV
Max Aperture Value = F4
Metering Mode = Pattern
Light Source = unknown
Flash = Flash did not fire, auto mode
Focal Length = 128mm
Maker Note = 8584 Byte
User Comment =
Flashpix Version = Version 1.0
Color Space = sRGB
Exif Image Width = 3648
Exif Image Height = 2736
File Source = DSC
Custom Rendered = Normal process
Exposure Mode = Manual exposure
White Balance = Auto white balance
Digital Zoom Ratio = 1x
Scene Capture Type = Normal
Gain Control = None
Contrast = Normal
Saturation = Normal
Sharpness = Soft

[Thumbnail]
Thumbnail = 160 x 120

Attached Images
 
Mr Ranger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 14, 2008, 2:07 AM   #5
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 804
Default

Mr. Ranger, in my opinion, anyone who uses a camera to take more than casual snapshots uses software to enhance the image.

How different is the first picture that you posted (the one whose "look" you would like to copy) from the original that came straight out of the camera? There's no way of knowing without seeing the original.

It looks to me that the color saturation and contrast have been boosted. Also, I don't see any shadows except right underneath the dogs. This could mean that the photo was taken on an overcast day where the light was fairly even. Or, the photographer might have used a reflector or fill-flash to light the dogs more evenly. It could even be that there is a special area set up with some tent poles and a roof of some diffusing material like cheese cloth to soften the light.

If you really want to know, and there is any way at all to contact the guy who took that shot, then ask him. All he can do is ignore you -- and some people might be flattered at the interest and actually help you out!

What I suggest is that you post one or more of your dog shots in the "Xtreme Makeover" forum. This forum is dedicated to having other people (usually with more editing experience than the poster has) play with your pictures to make them look better. Then you could get a pretty good idea of just how much your photos could be helped by post processing. If you see some results that you really like, ask the person for the details of how they got those results. That will give you a big leg-up on how to do it yourself.

Grant
granthagen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 14, 2008, 5:19 AM   #6
Senior Member
 
musket's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 2,782
Default

Useful tips from Granthagem..

bright and cloudy versus sunshine, reflective

surroundings off scene somewhere maybe

On one of my camerasthe D80, when reviewingthe shot

withthe cameralcd screen, highlights flash showing overexposed

areas in the shot these can help with exposure adjustments

for preceeding shots, to illustrate this I have shown these up

marked in red in the two scenes, itdepends how these highlights

effect the photo as to whether they are benificial or not......:|.....musket.
Attached Images
 
musket is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 14, 2008, 5:22 AM   #7
Senior Member
 
musket's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 2,782
Default

And I'll try a variation edit to see whatI come up with :-)..........musket.
Attached Images
 
musket is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 14, 2008, 10:39 AM   #8
Moderator
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 8,529
Default

A couple other suggestions.

First - your shot was taken in sunlight. That's tough. I would recommend taking in more shade (that way you don't have blown highlights and washed out). Don't be afraid of using flash as fill light in shade.

Second - Is the breed so uncontrollable? In both shots it looks like the handler is struggling to handle the dogs. That doesn't display the subject in the best light. If I were in the market for a dog from a reputable breeder I would expect a demonstration the dogs were well behaved and didn't need to be restrained.

Third - you want faster shutter speeds. 1/200 can show a bit of movement. Bump up the ISO - you want 1/400 or better - preferably 1/800 so you don't get any movement from the dog or handler.

Also, as with any breed there are likely important characteristics people look for. The photo should highlight those characteristics (whether it's sholders, hips, head, whatever - I'm not a breeder.

Hope that helps.
JohnG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 15, 2008, 1:14 AM   #9
Junior Member
 
Mr Ranger's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 17
Default

Thank you very much guys. Great suggestions, you've given me a number of ideas!
Mr Ranger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 18, 2008, 1:16 AM   #10
Junior Member
 
Mr Ranger's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 17
Default

See if these are any better.
Mr Ranger is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 6:25 AM.