Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Post Your Photos > Photo Critiques

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Jun 20, 2008, 5:09 PM   #1
Senior Member
 
jack55's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Tacoma, WA
Posts: 949
Default

Here are some more shots taken with the Sony DSC-H50. My very first Rose bloom from outside. Same rose, different types of lighting, outdoor, indoors, hand-held, only one with flash, resized for here. You couldn't hand hold a camera a couple years ago and get shots like these.
Which one stands out the most? How can I improve them besides the obvious, using a tripod. I was testing the hand-holding capabilities of this camera.

The ROSE inside hand-held with flash.


The ROSE outside in sunlight, hand-held.


The ROSE inside hand-held with window light, no flash.


The ROSE inside hand-held with window light behind it.
(can't remember if I used flash here or not)

jack55 is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Jun 23, 2008, 6:41 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
jack55's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Tacoma, WA
Posts: 949
Default

Wow! :? My shots must be pretty crummy as not one comment and it has been several days. Oh well... let me try again:

Here is another outdoor, bright sunlight flower shot in my garden:
It is NOT macro, stead shot with my zoom at 45mm, F5, 1/500sec, 100 ISO, program mode resized to 800 pixel width with 20% compression.


jack55 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 24, 2008, 10:38 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 514
Default

I can't offer much in improvement tips. The two with natural lighting and no flash are hands down the best though.


NotDadsW41 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 28, 2008, 2:03 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
jack55's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Tacoma, WA
Posts: 949
Default

One more... hand-held, taken in my living-room in available light


jack55 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 28, 2008, 3:12 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
musket's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 2,782
Default

Beautiful shots, compostion clarity and colour are just great..................musket.
musket is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 28, 2008, 10:55 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
mtngal's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Frazier Park, CA
Posts: 16,056
Default

This is definitely not my area of expertise, but I'll take a stab at it. I really like your outside pictures (the second rose and the yellow flowers). Wouldn't change anything on them.

I'm not crazy about the vertical blinds in the first one. The last rose (you posted it later) is better in my eyes (though it shows some camera shake - as you pointed out, a tripod would help there). The other thing I'm not crazy about in the first one is the flash shadow (not only am I horrible at still lifes, I really struggle with flash, too!). Don't ask me what to do about it though (move the flowers further away from the backdrop maybe?).

The third one is nice - the flowers are lovely. If you have an opportunity to shoot it again, you might try using a sheet or something on the floor with less texture. I notice you shot it with f2.7 so you've got about as small a DOF as you can. I'm not sure it would make a big difference, but would be worth the experiment (it's digital, so why not?).

The fourth one is better than the first one, since the blinds are more OOF, and the flowers stand out better without the obvious flash shadow, but I'm still find the blinds distracting.

These are just my opinions, I'm no pro and reflect more my taste (or lack of it?)in pictures. From a technical standpoint, the pictures are fine, other than the last one having some camera shake, not surprising sinceyou used 1/6 sec for a shutter speed. You should be pleased with them.
mtngal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 28, 2008, 11:22 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
jack55's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Tacoma, WA
Posts: 949
Default

Great tips! I'm just playing around with my new camera learning the many features.

Sure... the last one would have been sharper on a tripod, but I wanted to see just how good the Sony would be hand holding in fair low light. I was please with the results.

BTW, I discovered that wasn't my best one, so I replaced the last photo with the slightly better/sharper one.

NOTE: Even though it's hand-held, I helped it as much as possible by kneeling down and putting my elbow on the couch end to steady myself. The first one I posted, before replacing with this one was standing up so it was a tad fuzzier.
jack55 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jun 29, 2008, 12:34 AM   #8
Senior Member
 
mtngal's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Frazier Park, CA
Posts: 16,056
Default

Now (my opinion)that's the best one of your indoor ones - a good choice to replace the other one with. I very much like it, and it's impressive that it's hand-held with such a slow shutter speed. It looks like you are having a great time with the new camera!

Image stabilization can help a whole bunch, but as you found out - there is a limit to its effectiveness. Keep playing around with it and you'll have a good idea where your personal limits are with that particular camera (my personal experience is that it varies from person to person and camera to camera). And if you keep taking pictures like this, you'll have a nice selection of pictures, too.
mtngal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 1, 2008, 10:55 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
jack55's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Tacoma, WA
Posts: 949
Default

I am having trouble getting [glow=red]RED[/glow]roses correctly in bright sunlight. Can someone give me some tips?


jack55 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 1, 2008, 11:33 PM   #10
Senior Member
 
mtngal's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Frazier Park, CA
Posts: 16,056
Default

Most digital cameras I've used have struggled with red. Can you adjust the saturation on the Sony? You might try lowering it some (or lower it with software - Lightroom allows you to lower the saturation for specific colors, you can leave the rest of the colors alone). I've only been partly successful using that.

Another thought occured to me, just looking at your picture - I wonder what would happen if you tried underexposing the picture a bit? The camera metered from the red mostly and while I wouldn't call it over-exposed, I think you have some latitude. I hadn't thought about trying that before so I have no idea if it would help or not.

If anyone knows of a sure fire way of dealing with the "red" issue, I'd like to know, too.

P.S. I took a look at it using Lightroom, lowering exposure helps, so underexposing the shot would probably help.

mtngal is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 7:55 PM.