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Old Oct 13, 2008, 7:26 AM   #21
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Trojansoc wrote:
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I think this is a wonderful series. The two photos that I like best are clearly #1 & #3. In both cases, it's the eyes that make the photo work for me. In #3 I do think cropping some of the background on the right side would have been better because I don't think it adds anything to the photo, but the eyes and expression are so great that I don't think it's a major flaw.

I've always said "Don't go to a gunfight armed with a cap gun," and that's the position I'm in when it comes to formal photographic training--I'm not even at the pea shooter level, so I won't try tojustify my opinion regarding the question of the blown highlights in #2. I do think the expression is wonderful and the overall effect is good.

Thanks for posting.

Paul
Paul I meant to thank you for your opinion on my photos. Unfortunately #3 was a difficult crop for me, I just could not get it right, I did not want it dead center either. I have no formal training either, i just take spontaneous shots and hope that some people like them. So far Ive made some money out of it so I'm happy. The bottom line is that some of these are better than snapshots for a photo album which is all the parents wanted. They have several formal portraits that were done by the pro studio photographer and wanted something a little different. I have been photographing these children since they were babies in the same manner. As for the printouts, I rework them if the initial print shows dark patches, its not that hard

regards
Julie
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Old Oct 13, 2008, 7:41 AM   #22
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bahadir wrote:
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That's been a great series, Julie

Itmightbe misleading tryingto interpretthings in therealm of beautydependingonone or twoparameters only!As you put it # 1 could also be a striking image witha uncut hand!My fave, however,is #2 here with the 'divine light' highlighting the subject whomanagesto freeze even the power of time with that sudden look : )
Thanks for taking the time to comment, I know there is an overexposure problem with the shot, however I have no problem seeing her expression on my monitor

Julie
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Old Oct 13, 2008, 7:41 AM   #23
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Donna A. wrote:
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nice work j. I just had to stop by.
thanks for taking a look Donna
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Old Oct 13, 2008, 7:45 AM   #24
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Ollie77 wrote:
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Firstly these are all great images. Blown up to 20xXX sizes and framed with a nice off white mat and black 1" black frame they would look great on a wall, not in an album.

Secondly, the saying goes "beauty is in the eye of the beholder" it does not say 'beauty is in the eye of the most technically and rule abiding viewer". So with that said I would say that you Rodney are blind.

Rules are meant to be broken and no matter how high you wish to sit on your mighty rule stallion Rodney, you can't possibly sit way up there and think that because the images, according to your rules, are only worthy of an album spot and nothing more. Compared to your image of the little girl with her dolls, I would rather any of these any day of the week. These show real emotion and as far as lighting goes pretty much put your shots to shame.
Use of lighting shouldn't just be to sterilize any ugly unwanted shadows.

But go right ahead and tell me I don't understand a thing about lighting or about what ever else you wish to tell me and others that we are all wrong about and most likely breaking rules that can't be broken for fear of the photographer's boogieman coming to get us.

Aladyforty, keep up the great work, masterfully done considering how hard it is to get kids to perform. I suggest you move onto animals now, they are just as hard.

Ollie
Thanks for your comments, I never said they were perfect and never wanted only praise, I do however don't think they are only photo album quality. You hit the nail on the head, I was trying to show the emotion, the shot with the girl looking down was taken just after she buried a loved pet, I think i was trying to capture that expression for her parents
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Old Oct 13, 2008, 7:47 AM   #25
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Lawquepicker wrote:
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Well. I know a thing or two about royalty...and the "Queen". Having had the pleasure of many visits to the palace myself. This portrait is indeed generally recognized as being a capture highy regarded by the English press as well as the official office overseeing the likenesses of her majesty approved by the palace itself.

I wasn't aware there were any higher authorities. Thank you Rodney. I'm sure Buckingham Palace will be in touch. The foregone conclusion is you may well be their new headmaster.



Best regards...
thanks for looking at my photos, I think you will probably find that Rodney is right about the photo of the queen not being the official one. However I have seen some photos from professional photographers and very good ones at that, that break all the rules, light, shadow and composition wise. I was looking for something to compare with my photo
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Old Oct 13, 2008, 10:08 AM   #26
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Julie,


I never denied that you have some nice shots here. You presented them on a Critiques & Techniques forum which is what we do when we want constructive criticism. While each image has good qualities, there are areas that could have been improved or modified to make those images more effective and have a greater impact. I've shot thousands of portraits and never once have I felt I've achieved the kind of results that I hope to one day achieve. I always want the next portrait to be better, have more impact than the one before.


When you look at the work of well known photographers you see elements similar to those in your own images. In some that may be exactly what you are seeing and in others it is probably just your perception. Example: When using a hair light you should set it about 1 stop higher than your shadows. The human eye recognizes that the hair isn't really brighter than the front of the face, but we often "think" it is the brightest element. When you see shots where back lighting or accent lights were used it isn't really the brightest element in the scene when done correctly. Frank, used to post images on the People forum that demonstrated the use of accent lighting to create effective highlights on his subjects. I didn't see all of his work, but the shots I did see he had nailed the ratios and the accent lighting didn't create distractions. He knows how to effectively implement the rules so the result is that he can effectively break those rules or at least make it appear he has broken the rules.


You take great pictures and you have an eye for that special shot. If you expect more from yourself and want to elevate your photography to a higher level then you need to get back to the basics and build from there. Otherwise, the shots you take 10 years from now will look much like the ones you take today and there is absolutely nothing wrong with that if you have met your expectations of yourself.


Best regards,
Rodney
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Old Oct 13, 2008, 10:23 AM   #27
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RodneyBlair wrote:
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Julie,


I never denied that you have some nice shots here. You presented them on a Critiques & Techniques forum which is what we do when we want constructive criticism. While each image has good qualities, there are areas that could have been improved or modified to make those images more effective and have a greater impact. I've shot thousands of portraits and never once have I felt I've achieved the kind of results that I hope to one day achieve. I always want the next portrait to be better, have more impact than the one before.


When you look at the work of well known photographers you see elements similar to those in your own images. In some that may be exactly what you are seeing and in others it is probably just your perception. Example: When using a hair light you should set it about 1 stop higher than your shadows. The human eye recognizes that the hair isn't really brighter than the front of the face, but we often "think" it is the brightest element. When you see shots where back lighting or accent lights were used it isn't really the brightest element in the scene when done correctly. Frank, used to post images on the People forum that demonstrated the use of accent lighting to create effective highlights on his subjects. I didn't see all of his work, but the shots I did see he had nailed the ratios and the accent lighting didn't create distractions. He knows how to effectively implement the rules so the result is that he can effectively break those rules or at least make it appear he has broken the rules.


You take great pictures and you have an eye for that special shot. If you expect more from yourself and want to elevate your photography to a higher level then you need to get back to the basics and build from there. Otherwise, the shots you take 10 years from now will look much like the ones you take today and there is absolutely nothing wrong with that if you have met your expectations of yourself.


Best regards,
Rodney
What i need is a simple explanation of rules of contrast and center of interest , because I really am having a tough time understanding the whole thing here.
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Old Oct 13, 2008, 10:28 AM   #28
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Hey Julie,

I'm sorry that I didn't recognize that you didn't understand so I am going to get you all the info you need. Give me a few hours to get it together though.

Rodney
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Old Oct 13, 2008, 10:45 AM   #29
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RodneyBlair wrote:
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Hey Julie,

I'm sorry that I didn't recognize that you didn't understand so I am going to get you all the info you need. Give me a few hours to get it together though.

Rodney
well thanks, I will endeavor to try and understand it all. I shoot on instinct more than anything, I am blind in one eye and I often wonder if I also see things slightly differently as well. Who knows
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