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Old Jan 2, 2009, 10:29 PM   #11
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Jack-

What a REALLY great shot! You have very effectively captured a really excellent hummer photo. And that is really hard to do!

Please tell us more about how you captured this really great photo?

Sarah Joyce
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Old Jan 2, 2009, 10:32 PM   #12
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Jack-

You have moved up from the Sony H-50 to a really great DSLR camera the Olympus E-510. Congratulations! here is one of my favorite E-510 photos.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Jan 2, 2009, 11:11 PM   #13
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mtclimber wrote:
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Jack-

What a REALLY great shot! You have very effectively captured a really excellent hummer photo. And that is really hard to do!

Please tell us more about how you captured this really great photo?

Sarah Joyce
Do you know just how hard it is to get photos like this? Not many photos of hummingbirds in the wintertime.
First, it was COLD, 27 degrees out, my hands froze as I couldn't wear gloves as I had to feel the controls on the camera. Took a few days of an hour of waiting to get these three shots. I had some so-so shots until this series.
Second: Setting the controls and getting the composition is not easy with the hummingbird as they don't hold still!
• They fly forward, backward, shift sideways, stop in midair.
• They can beat their wings 60 to 200 times per second.
• They can fly up to 60 miles per hour.
So with that in mind, this is probably the best I can do.
This particular day was very cold and snowing and this little guy was hungry and was waiting for me to thaw out his feeder with a floodlight which also made for a backlighting.
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Old Jan 4, 2009, 10:52 PM   #14
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Thanks for the explanation of the lighting - I had been wondering if you had used some type of flash or something. The pictures are wonderful!
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Old Jan 4, 2009, 11:40 PM   #15
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mtngal wrote:
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Thanks for the explanation of the lighting - I had been wondering if you had used some type of flash or something. The pictures are wonderful!
Thank you! I just took this one this morning....


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Old Jan 27, 2009, 10:44 PM   #16
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Here are three more I took yesterday. It makes my day to see this little hummer. So far this little hummer has survived 4 snowstorms here in the NW.

Which of these three do you like and why. I shot this right before sunset. It says 5:25am in properties? It was 4:25pm. Taken with Olympus E-510 w/40-150mm zoom @ 73mm - 1/180 - F6.3 - ISO 100 - fine spot. PhotoShop mask sharpening & cropping.








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Old Jan 28, 2009, 7:40 AM   #17
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While you describe the difficulties in shooting the hummingbird, the only thing you need is patience. This isnt just luck you have so many great shots. You know where the bird will be. You have the lighting set, the distance measured, the frame composed. Now patience comes in waiting for that bird to enter frame and get his drink while you get his picture. If you had a remote control you could probably take these shots while standing in the warmth and comfort behind the window closest to the feeder.
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Old Jan 28, 2009, 11:54 AM   #18
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Bynx wrote:
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While you describe the difficulties in shooting the hummingbird, the only thing you need is patience. This isnt just luck you have so many great shots. You know where the bird will be. You have the lighting set, the distance measured, the frame composed. Now patience comes in waiting for that bird to enter frame and get his drink while you get his picture. If you had a remote control you could probably take these shots while standing in the warmth and comfort behind the window closest to the feeder.
Only thing I need is patience? Lot's of patience as h7edge says below. However, have YOU tried to shoot these amazing fast-zipping birds? Sounds like you like the lazy way of doing things shooting from inside the house. :lol: With my camera, Olympus E-510, the remote sucks (as I tried what you were suggesting) as it only works if the camera is facing directly in front of you, not at a angle and especially from behind. The remote also doesn't work at any distance either and if I did, it wouldn't work as the background sucked on that side. That remote only works like say your shooting yourself in the photo. You have to get the distance exactly right to the inch with the zoom or the photo is blurred. You have to get a lot of shots as the wings in different position blur the body. Camera pre-settings is all important too as you say. I could go on, but you get the idea. It is tough to get a good shot.

Now I can't wait for Spring for when I can get some lovely flowers in the shot. I have that planned.

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Fantastic shot! This summer I waited sometimes hours a day for weeks and NEVER got the shot of the 2 Humming birds that visited my feeder from time to time. I have a trumpiter vine near by which they love and I tried there too... no such luck. Very nice shot!

-Rob
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Old Jan 28, 2009, 3:03 PM   #19
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I spent 2 weeks once photographing hummingbirds. I had just got my camera and wasnt as used to it as I am now. It is a point and shoot with no special features (Fuji S700) and cant compete with your Olympus. Through that experience I learned it was a simple matter of manual focusing on the yellow feeding flower, opening the lens to the right fstop to get me the fastest shutter speed I could get. Then it was just patience sitting in a cramped position for hours at a time getting as many shots as I could. Being skittish birds it wasnt very many shots at a time. Out of a lot of shots I was able to select a couple that I liked but knew they werent milestone shots. Just pretty good for first attempts. I still stand by the fact its not difficult to shoot these since you know exactly where they will be. So distance, exposure and timing are no consideration. Just the patience to be there to click the shutter at the right time. Now I sit here and just look to my left and shoot the birds about 3 feet from me on the feeder. Im on the top floor of a 5 story apartment building so unfortunately Ive not had any hummingbirds up this high. I do keep a feeder hanging just in case. As for the comment about using a remote I wasnt refering to the remote you are using. But I was referring to a proper remote which will work under these conditions. Its not necessary to be a slave to the shutter. I know at my age it gets quite painful to sit for hours waiting for that 1/1000 of a second to happen. I believe knowing when and where is the hardest part of taking a photo. Watching your feeder you know when its their feeding time. So you have the where and when down pretty good. Its just a matter of pointing the camera there and being ready. All this being said, I hope you dont think it belittles your shots. They are truly spectacular. Everything is just right. And I have to say that gold sheen you have picked up on the birds coat is something else again. Ive never seen a coat like that on any of the hummers Ive shot. Congratulations.
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