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Old Apr 6, 2009, 11:44 PM   #1
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Hi all,

I just took this potrait of my son. Was experimenting with props (his hands). Is the pic under-exposed? Any other comments welcome too.
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Old Apr 7, 2009, 10:16 AM   #2
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Idon't think the problem here is underexposure, but the deep shadows on the subject's face which requre the use of fill in flash. You might still appythrough photoshop.Btw, looks like a clever boy : )
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Old Apr 7, 2009, 12:05 PM   #3
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Thanks Bahadir for stopping by & viewing this picture and even correcting it. I did use 'fill flash' and higher ISO number (ISO 800) still didn't get the desired light. Photoshop is the last resort of-course but I am practising to get the correct shot out of camera.

Thanks also for complimenting his inheritance......:-)


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Old Apr 8, 2009, 3:24 PM   #4
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Since you are looking for non post processing solutions, here's another thought to deal with the shadows on his face - try using a reflector along with whatever fill flash you used. Several months ago I picked up a small reflector that has silver on one side and gold on the other - it's a 12" diameter circle that "folds" up into a case that fits in your hand (and my camera bag pocket!). Cost $14 at a camera store not known for discounts, so I suspect you could find something similar for less on-line, or just use aluminum foil. I was surprised how much help it can be to deal with shadows - the effect isn't like a fill flash, much less obvious, but really nice.
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Old Apr 8, 2009, 8:37 PM   #5
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Thanks indeed mtngal. Will try this method for sure.
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Old Apr 10, 2009, 3:17 AM   #6
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Good tip from mtngal actually. I used the D40x (theonebeforethe D60 you have) as back up for some time. I should saysetting the shutter speed to 1/80or sthenough to avoid motion blur,andthe Aperturesth. between the widest possible and f/8 , while the ISObeing as low as 200 or 400 @Matrix metering mode,Icould forget anything butsimply enjoy shooting at poorly lit parties being invariably pleased about theshots even with the on board flash! Btw, photoshopmakes a greatresort if you shoot in RAW to get the most of what your sensor had actually captured.Anyway, I believe an economical but well proven SB600flash unit would beagreat treat for yourself if you're seriously considering flash photography.

Cheers,

Bahadır
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Old Apr 11, 2009, 2:42 AM   #7
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Yes a flash unit would help to solve problems like these but todayI found another solution. I placed the subject near the window and got most of the light from there. But I stood opposite to the source and used fill flash to cover up the other side. This way the subject is evenly lit and the color mix of sunlight & flash light gives a glow on the picture.

Feel free to comment, anyone.

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Old Apr 12, 2009, 2:50 PM   #8
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It seems the camera focused on the hands if not complete OOF Thus I'd suggestselectingsingle focuspoint and recompose in such scenariosto guarantee the face of the subject in focus.Also consider the synch speed limit of your on board flash (I thinknot as fast as the the earlier D40 model)so as to prevent burned features. As I also wrote above, I find the matrix metering of the nikonscapable of almostmagically predicting what you're intending to photograph. So, highly recommendedwith thefill flash! Btw, you might alsolike to clone out the flash inthe subject'seyes..
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Old Apr 20, 2009, 8:35 PM   #9
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hi i hope u like what i have done
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Old Apr 21, 2009, 10:46 AM   #10
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bahadir wrote:
Quote:
Btw, you might alsolike to clone out the flash inthe subject'seyes..
I will respectfully disagree here. Catch light is one of th benefits of flash. But, much in photography is personal taste - so try cloning it and see which version you prefer. I do agree the focus is on the hands when it should be on the eyes.

In the second exposure, the midtones appear underexposed and the white balance looks off - not natural skin tones at all. The exif indicates you set a manual white balance. How did you arrive at the value to use? It has a very greenish tint to it.


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