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Old Jan 12, 2010, 2:14 AM   #1
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Default Tree's in the Winter

I took some pics in the woods a day or two ago. I came out with some decent pics but then a few more were horrible. All of these were taken on a tripod with a Canon T1i with stock kit lens. If you go to the link below, you can see the EXIF.

The following pic

I took some other pics and this one just came out bad, others had clear and defined branches. Note: this was taken on a tripod with no moment.





Last edited by HeavyBird; Mar 21, 2010 at 12:46 AM.
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Old Jan 12, 2010, 2:27 AM   #2
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What bothers me most, is that my eyes are drawn to the fringing on the trees. Seems to have allot of PF? The colors seem off to me as well. Over all the image is missing a focal point. Comp is OK, I think it would look better in mono chrome. I am sorry I am not of more help.
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Old Jan 12, 2010, 7:51 PM   #3
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I was more wondering why the tree's fringed like that.
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Old Jan 12, 2010, 9:04 PM   #4
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You're uploading your images on a knife forum. I'm a fan of Japanese kitchen knives. In fact I own a Masamoto, a Kanemasa gyuto, etc. But I guess you should upload your picks using other image hosting sites.

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Old Jan 13, 2010, 12:18 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ordo View Post
You're uploading your images on a knife forum. I'm a fan of Japanese kitchen knives. In fact I own a Masamoto, a Kanemasa gyuto, etc. But I guess you should upload your picks using other image hosting sites.
Its my site, I run the site as I am a avid knife collector.
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Old Jan 13, 2010, 6:18 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HeavyBird View Post
...why the tree's fringed like that.
You might not want to know - and I am probably stepping into a hornets-nest saying that - but it's mainly because it was shot with Canon-glass. Canon was never good with glass that does not show CA / PF and neither do they have software good enough to get rid of PF - either that or PF comes late in their order of priority when designing lenses and / or software.
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Old Jan 13, 2010, 1:17 PM   #7
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It appears you've discovered chromatic aberration a nifty little result of different wavelengths of light having different refractive indexes. This will happen when a lens is unable to focus all the wavelengths onto the same spot due to the dispersion of light going through non-perfect or non-corrected lens. Of course a perfect lens is nothing more than a fairy tale as materials that have negative refractive indexes are experimental and certainly no where near market. Right now NRI metamaterials are being used for experimental "invisibility" cloaks although they only work for certain wavelengths and so far none work in the visible wavelengths. But anyway, looks like a graduated neutral density filter would have saved you a lot of grief here. I believe chromatic aberration is less pronounced when there's less of a contrast (bright sky against dark branches = huge contrast). Or I guess exposure bracketing. But what do I know.
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Old Jan 14, 2010, 11:05 PM   #8
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There are a couple of things that I thought of with your shot. First, it does look like the dynamic range is beyond the camera - the sky is blown out (or almost so) and the road and trees are in shadow (which contributes to that cold, bluish look) and so much darker than the sky. High contrast situations like the dark trees against a light/white background will bring out CA and PF if a lens is at all susceptible to it. You could try either doing an exposure bracketed series to combine later with software for an HDR, but you probably would still have to deal with the CA/PF somehow, or try the grad neutral density filter suggested above. Another thing to try is to dial in a -Ev value (experiment as to how much) so that the sky isn't so blown out, then try to bring back the shadows with software (if you do this, shoot raw as you usually have more leeway for adjustment).
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Old Jan 14, 2010, 11:26 PM   #9
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I see you use the scene mode. You are shooting against a bright background, but the near light is really cold. A Grad ND would have help. I would try using Av mode and set the White Balance closer to the light that was available in the light environment you were in. And since it looked like it was twight light you may want to use the bracketing feature with an exposure compensation set of 1/3 or 2/3. The light seems off to me from you shots.

Last edited by shoturtle; Jan 14, 2010 at 11:31 PM.
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