Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Post Your Photos > Photo Critiques

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Jan 17, 2010, 5:17 AM   #11
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Savannah, GA (USA)
Posts: 22,378
Default

Your ISO speeds are very high, causing increased noise. You also have a lot of darker areas (where noise will be higher). For example, the main part of the photo with the arch is underexposed (perhaps because of the light coming in through the trees fooling the metering, as you often get with a back lit subject).

For stationary subjects, there's really no reason to use higher ISO speeds like that (you didn't need shutter speeds that fast).

If it gets too dark for hand held photos (and that was not the case here), you can use a tripod, keeping ISO speeds set lower.

Lighting was also bad. If it looks dreary outside, the photos are probably going to look the same way.
JimC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 17, 2010, 8:16 AM   #12
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Savannah, GA (USA)
Posts: 22,378
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by JimC View Post
Lighting was also bad. If it looks dreary outside, the photos are probably going to look the same way.
Here's a good read on that subject. Make sure to use a "mouse over" on the first photo in the article.

http://luminous-landscape.com/essays/30seconds.shtml
JimC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 17, 2010, 8:44 AM   #13
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 18
Default

i didnt know that high iso causes increased noise, hmm cool. the photo was taken around 5 pm, when the sun was just about to set, but i coudlnt get any good shots in, because of the surrounding trees blocking the little bit of light coming through. it was cloudy and cold, and i wanted to see if i can snap some sillhouettes, but i guess another day with a tripod. now my goal is to learn about metering. and go back to that place..anyways thanks for all the help guys appreciate it
k-man is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 17, 2010, 8:54 AM   #14
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Savannah, GA (USA)
Posts: 22,378
Default

Absolutely.

When you increase ISO speed (especially to levels that high), you're going to have increased noise and/or loss of detail from noise reduction (from the camera's image processing trying to clean it up).

Each time you double the ISO speed, the camera can use shutter speeds twice as fast for the same lighting and aperture setting.

But, because the shutter is not open for as long, you're capturing a much weaker signal. As a result, the camera has to amplify that signal to insure proper exposure.

That amplification can be like turning up the volume on a weak radio station, only instead of getting hum, static and hiss, you get image noise.
JimC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 17, 2010, 11:16 AM   #15
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: NYC
Posts: 1,990
Default

The first image simply does not appear to be in focus (or perhaps some camera shake is involved).

I like the second shot, although as has been pointed out, noise is going to be inevitable with a high ISO, and to make it worse, this was a dark scene to begin with. Except with the lowest ISO's, some noise will occur in the shadows.

If you actually printed the second shot, not much of the noise would be visible at any normal viewing distance. Programs like Noise Ninja would eliminate much of the noise anyway.

Dave
Chato is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 17, 2010, 11:26 AM   #16
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 18
Default

ya, during the trek, i had a hard time focusing. i didnt want to do depend on AF but manual wasnt anybetter unless its a near by subject. i couldnt really use the VF to focus in properly, i had really little wiggle room to focus and i was working with really blurry, or somewhat focused but the subject is too far to really notice..any tips?..

noise ninja ehh..i will give that a shot, thanks for that
k-man is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 17, 2010, 3:53 PM   #17
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: NYC
Posts: 1,990
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by k-man View Post
ya, during the trek, i had a hard time focusing. i didnt want to do depend on AF but manual wasnt anybetter unless its a near by subject. i couldnt really use the VF to focus in properly, i had really little wiggle room to focus and i was working with really blurry, or somewhat focused but the subject is too far to really notice..any tips?..

noise ninja ehh..i will give that a shot, thanks for that
Noise Ninja, Noiseware Pro, Neat Image, and there are some other good ones - But these three I am familiar with, and ALL of them will do the job. I prefer Noise Ninja, probably because I am most familiar with it. I believe that all have free demos...

Dave
Chato is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 17, 2010, 4:08 PM   #18
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Savannah, GA (USA)
Posts: 22,378
Default

You may also want to experiment shooting in raw. Note that Bibble Pro has Noise Ninja standard built into it's work flow (although they don't give you all of the features unless you upgrade Noise Ninja to the registered version). You can download a trial to see if you like it or not.

http://www.bibblelabs.com
JimC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 18, 2010, 12:44 PM   #19
Senior Member
 
musket's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 2,782
Default

Your photos at the photobucket size are reasonable for very high ISO
with poorly lit scenes, and exposure settings without an artificial light
source helping.

If you blow-up sections of the photo's then you're going to notice
artifacts and noise prevalent in the scene. Ideally low ISO and well
lit scenes produce best results( Image quality(IQ) ) and if you're
going to want poster size prints 12"x 10" or larger then a very fast
lens, an artificial light source, tripod etc., are worth thinking about
if you choose poorly lit scenes.

Higher ISO and longer exposures often
mean more noise, you can often get away with it if you don't blow-up
the scenes or sections of the scene and make the flaws stand out.

Last edited by musket; Jan 18, 2010 at 1:12 PM.
musket is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 18, 2010, 1:11 PM   #20
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 18
Default

yaa, i took the advice that you guys gave me, i had a party last night and i made sure the scene was lit, low iso as possible..slow shutter speed, fast enough to prevent blur, and exposure setting, and it turned out wonderful, although i keep getting shadows of the people on the wall, thats the only downside to yesterday
k-man is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 8:21 AM.