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Old Jan 21, 2010, 1:20 PM   #1
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At last my D90 is back from the doctors.

But that doesn't seem to affect the weather... Still my camara and I go for walks around the district just in case something pops up. Since this hasn't happened I thought I would take things into my own hands.

I am fasinated by some of the art work that some seem managed to produce in B&W. So today I set my camara to monocrom and decided that I should walk and think in B&W. The snow started to fall rather heavily and the sky was quite dark. I'm not sure if this one works, but I think it is the best. Please do comment and tell me if the picture just doesn't cut it (Bynx?) or if there are alterations that might help it cut it.

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Old Jan 21, 2010, 2:46 PM   #2
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you set your d90 to mono ??? one of the best tips i ever got was always shoot in colour then convert it after as you can never go from a mono shot to colour
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Old Jan 21, 2010, 2:46 PM   #3
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hahaha it cuts it Al. But I would never recommend anyone to shoot in B&W. Its easier to convert color to B&W than to turn a B&W into color. It would just be my luck to shoot a really nice pic and only have a B&W file of it. Does this boat get frozen in?
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Old Jan 22, 2010, 3:24 AM   #4
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hahaha it cuts it Al. But I would never recommend anyone to shoot in B&W. Its easier to convert color to B&W than to turn a B&W into color. It would just be my luck to shoot a really nice pic and only have a B&W file of it. Does this boat get frozen in?
Thank you Bynx!

I see that I left out that I always shoot RAW pictures and this time I shot dual, so I have got a B&W jpg and a RAW (colour). The reason that I used the mono setting was because I wanted to think and see the B&W when I shot the pictures. My other B&W, from previous shootings, are not very good and I think the cause of this is that I was thinking in colour when I shot the pictures.

Last friday I was at a photo fair and one of Norway most famous photographers held a wee speach where he said that when he goes out to take B&W pictures he never takes with colour film (he doesn't use digital), because he wants be in B&W modus, colour should not be an option. And as Hards has commented on, B&W needs a totally different approach.
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Old Jan 22, 2010, 7:34 AM   #5
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Last friday I was at a photo fair and one of Norway most famous photographers held a wee speach where he said that when he goes out to take B&W pictures he never takes with colour film (he doesn't use digital), because he wants be in B&W modus, colour should not be an option. And as Hards has commented on, B&W needs a totally different approach.
I really dont agree with this at all, but thats my opinion. Whether B&W or color its about capturing the light. When B&W was all there was, Im sure the photographer was only thinking about capturing the details in the range from lightest to darkest areas in the scene. Color brought a lot more to the table. I wonder how many of us old farts like B&W just because it was more prevalent when we were kids than color and its more nostalgia than anything else. A good B&W print reminds us of the 30's and times gone by. Ive never thought of a thinking mode change when shooting B&W or Color. There is just one mode for me. Shoot the best you can and then convert to B&W if you see the need. Try to remember all the pics that made your jaw drop, your eyes water and the word WOW go off in your head. How many of those were B&W and how many were color?
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Old Jan 22, 2010, 11:32 AM   #6
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As you have no doubt noticed, i present a large proportion of my stuff in b&w. but never have i even once touched the b&w mode on my camera. and i really don't agree with this mindset that you have to be in B&W mode, especially since he shoots film. what difference does it make what film is in his camera, its all about framing a good shot and capturing the light.

beyond the philosophical arguments there are practical advantages to shooting in color. you have SO much more control. when you see a b&w i have presented, what you do not see is the tremendous amount of time i spent in the channel mixer, playing with each color slider to get the tonal range i am looking for. if you shoot in b&w you get what the camera decides, and thats it.
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Old Jan 22, 2010, 12:12 PM   #7
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Thanks Bynx and Hards. Yes Morten Krogvold, the photographers name, has his own opinions about taking pictures, some more essentric than others. Me, as an amatuer, am just trying to find ways to master various varieties of presenting a picture. And when a person of Krogvold's stature makes a statement about how he does it, I think to myself that I should give it a try. What he basicly says is when he sees a potential picture then he finishes processing the picture in his head before shooting it. So when he's shooting b&w then he imagens the finished product in front of him.

My camara is now sett to only taking raw again.
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Old Jan 22, 2010, 1:06 PM   #8
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Does this boat get frozen in?
Yes it does get frozen in, but that's not a problem with this one since it is a plastic (glassfiber) boat.

The chap that own's this boat is might have had a few sleepless nights this winter becaus it is a wooden boat and is moored at the same location as the plastic boat. Being wooden and not "shoe'ed" (what we call it here in Norway when wooden boat have copper plates nailed to the wooden hull at water level) the ice can easily press and squeeze the hull so that it starts to crack.

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Old Jan 22, 2010, 1:13 PM   #9
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beyond the philosophical arguments there are practical advantages to shooting in color. you have SO much more control. when you see a b&w i have presented, what you do not see is the tremendous amount of time i spent in the channel mixer, playing with each color slider to get the tonal range i am looking for. if you shoot in b&w you get what the camera decides, and thats it.
This pic I used Silver Efex Pro on. Great for converting since there are so many ways to set it up. And save your settings for any special look.
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Old Jan 22, 2010, 1:21 PM   #10
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Thanks for the tip Bynx, I'll give it a try.
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