Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Post Your Photos > Photo Critiques

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Feb 25, 2010, 6:17 PM   #11
Senior Member
 
Bynx's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 8,646
Default

Little bit of Shadow/Highlight and Auto Color. What I dont like about this scene now is the position of the camera. It makes me think Im the robber, standing off the trail looking for someone to come along. Id prefer to have the trail bleed off the bottom of the photo and put the viewer on the trail instead of in the bushes.
Attached Images
 

Last edited by Bynx; Feb 25, 2010 at 6:22 PM.
Bynx is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 25, 2010, 8:42 PM   #12
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 239
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bynx View Post
Little bit of Shadow/Highlight and Auto Color. What I dont like about this scene now is the position of the camera. It makes me think Im the robber, standing off the trail looking for someone to come along. Id prefer to have the trail bleed off the bottom of the photo and put the viewer on the trail instead of in the bushes.
I guess so...

Thank you.
adamvk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 25, 2010, 9:59 PM   #13
Senior Member
 
SharpShotGal's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Kitsap Penninsula, Washington State
Posts: 1,217
Default

I think that they are good I would take to good words before bad but first its you that have to give your own a feeling for what you feel for the shot others will either like it or not.... Welcome aboard AdamVK The first shot looks as if there may be a walk in the sky and its whats around the corner that awaits that may either be good or bad the second one looks like a nice place to walk..... as you may notice when you hit quick link to find the post of todays it will tell you how many have looked at your posts and how many have replied as well and it you reply back that will be a count as well... there are a lot of posts posted and so many to look at I forgo the words looking to see others works and when I see others really shoving the wind pipe out of order I will tell you that's wrong to be doing some do come here to actually take others down and that is a sore spot of life but hey I know there must be something wrong with the or they would not be here doing what they do .... like BYNX and the way he can not let me be me I dont do to well with periods... I ramble on to much for him or what I have to say will not hit the same cord in some one else as it has in me... its the same with colors some will affect others in a way that will not with another so enjoy the good and brush off the bad as you come and go through Steve's Dig Cam...
SharpShotGal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 26, 2010, 8:46 AM   #14
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: NYC
Posts: 1,990
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by adamvk View Post
Thanks for the help. I should starting shooting more with my DSLR as well, I think that would help me. Most of my images were shot with a Sony Cybershot camera since I only purchased my DSLR recently.

Here are the 2 images before PP:
He, heh, he - I like them BOTH better before PP...

With all due respect, and no matter what anyone tells you, Post processing is not as important as the actual framing, compostion, and settings for the actual taking of the shot.

From time to time I "save" a shot by using post processing. But you cannot make a shot great if it's not great to begin with.

The first shot is a bit better the way you took it, the second is MUCH better the way you took it. Use Post processing to enhance your shots not to make new shots...

Hey, that first shot is pretty neat, and the second, while nothing to write home about is a decent photograph.

Dave
Chato is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 26, 2010, 9:12 AM   #15
Senior Member
 
Alasdair's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Fredrikstad, Norway
Posts: 233
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chato View Post
He, heh, he - I like them BOTH better before PP...

With all due respect, and no matter what anyone tells you, Post processing is not as important as the actual framing, compostion, and settings for the actual taking of the shot.

From time to time I "save" a shot by using post processing. But you cannot make a shot great if it's not great to begin with.

The first shot is a bit better the way you took it, the second is MUCH better the way you took it. Use Post processing to enhance your shots not to make new shots...

Hey, that first shot is pretty neat, and the second, while nothing to write home about is a decent photograph.

Dave
I totally agree with Dave. What I like about the first origional photo (pre processing) is the mystique. It's really nice. The composition is very good and the fog softens the picture naturally giving it a mysterious mood.

Your second picture has more natural colours origionally, but it is as Bynx pointed out, as if you are in hiding or on the lookout. It doesn't really work for me, but pictures like this will effect everyone differently. I can only speak for myself.

We all take bad pictures. Sometimes I get lost in the processing and end up making a good picture bad. It's as though you see yourself blind on a picture when processing it for a long time. With some pictures, that I'm not sure about, I sometimes processes them once and put them away for a few days before having another look at them. If I'm still not sure I might post them here (making Bynx's day! ) or forget about them. My advice would be to take a lot of pictures, but always think: "what is it I wish to show."

Remember that you can never make a bad picture good through processing.
Alasdair is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 26, 2010, 7:54 PM   #16
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 239
Default

Thanks guys.

I do get "caught up" in Post-Processing. I just keep adding layers and enhancements and I forget how much I've actually changed the image.
adamvk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 27, 2010, 8:37 AM   #17
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: London
Posts: 12
Default

Like the first shot - v. nice composition, but its better in my opinion before the processing. However, take your point that it is easy to get lost in processing.

The second one is also better before processing, but its not as good a photo. I think getting a good woodland scene is difficult - there is just too much going on and even with the strong curve of the path in your photo, the eye gets distracted.

The dynamic range in woodland is also often very large - from sky showing through the branches to deep shadow which is going to upset the sensor. A good subject to try out HDR, but I often think the best woddland scenes concentrate on the detail - leaf or flower structure, bark, rocks etc.

Dave
Tringa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Feb 27, 2010, 2:45 PM   #18
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: NYC
Posts: 1,990
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tringa View Post
Like the first shot - v. nice composition, but its better in my opinion before the processing. However, take your point that it is easy to get lost in processing.

The second one is also better before processing, but its not as good a photo. I think getting a good woodland scene is difficult - there is just too much going on and even with the strong curve of the path in your photo, the eye gets distracted.

The dynamic range in woodland is also often very large - from sky showing through the branches to deep shadow which is going to upset the sensor. A good subject to try out HDR, but I often think the best woddland scenes concentrate on the detail - leaf or flower structure, bark, rocks etc.

Dave
I like shooting the woods. I search for dramtic contrasts: the sun shining down in an opening in the forest. A tree with dramtically twisted roots and branches. But this is not a woodland scene. The point of interest is the path. As Bynx said, the path should be used to draw in the viewers eye.

Here's a shot of a path I walk almost every morning in Summer. Usually I just walk it. It's pretty boring in relative terms. But there are moments...



Nothing to write home about. But it's a solution that would have worked quite well with the second shot. It was taken with a cheap Canon P&S.

Dave
Chato is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 1, 2010, 5:07 PM   #19
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 239
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chato View Post
I like shooting the woods. I search for dramtic contrasts: the sun shining down in an opening in the forest. A tree with dramtically twisted roots and branches. But this is not a woodland scene. The point of interest is the path. As Bynx said, the path should be used to draw in the viewers eye.

Here's a shot of a path I walk almost every morning in Summer. Usually I just walk it. It's pretty boring in relative terms. But there are moments...



Nothing to write home about. But it's a solution that would have worked quite well with the second shot. It was taken with a cheap Canon P&S.

Dave
The light looks sweet there.
adamvk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 1, 2010, 6:34 PM   #20
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: NYC
Posts: 1,990
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by adamvk View Post
The light looks sweet there.
Yeah, lasts for about two minutes, and the time of those two minutes changes every day. So I walk this path almost every morning with my huge lens and monopode, but always carry a P&S for those can't miss occasions.

Not a bad shot, but as I said, nothing to write home about. I could jazz it up a bit in PP, but I profer to capture the real scence - And that's it.

Dave
Chato is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 6:34 PM.