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Old Apr 20, 2010, 2:54 PM   #1
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Default Dutch world heritage

Me as a beginning photographer would like to have your opinions and possible tips on the following two pictures of Dutch world heritage: "the Windmills of Kinderdijk". Which one do you like best and what could be improved.
This is the first time I tried HDR.
The picture is taken with a Pentax K-x with the DA L 18-55 kit lens @ 18mm f8,0 iso 200

Kindest regards,

Carlo
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Old Apr 20, 2010, 3:02 PM   #2
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I cropped the photo's somewhat.. actually I might like it like this better..
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Old Apr 20, 2010, 3:09 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JC de Jonge View Post
I cropped the photo's somewhat.. actually I might like it like this better..
While all are quite good, I prefer the very last one. Nice work!
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Old Apr 20, 2010, 4:33 PM   #4
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In the first pic cropping off the sky is all it needs in my opinion. Its nice seeing that very long straight road. In the second your crop is good. Nice shots considering you are shooting into the sun.
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Old Apr 20, 2010, 6:51 PM   #5
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Sorry, but all of these picks look soft to the point of out of focus.
I guess it's better to begin with a technically good pick and then move on to hdr.
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Old Apr 21, 2010, 2:31 AM   #6
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Yes Ordo I agree with you that they do look soft. Nevertheless I wanted to try hdr because it was nearly impossible to make a reasonable photo with the light of the sun.
I'm not sure whether I set the focus to infinity or used the autofocus.
Any tips to make it more sharp/crisp (step down more?)
(edit: I just started using a dslr for about a month now so all tips are welcome)
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Old Apr 21, 2010, 2:44 AM   #7
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Nice any wooden shoe clad children to go along with?
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Old Apr 21, 2010, 3:34 AM   #8
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I live near those windmills... but to be honest I luckily never had wooden shoes
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Old Apr 21, 2010, 5:17 AM   #9
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Hey I live in Canada and I had a pair of wooden shoes. I still have them and they still fit. I have to be careful of woodpeckers and termites.
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Old Apr 21, 2010, 9:40 AM   #10
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There's a number of different ways to sharpen something that's a little soft. It partly depends on the picture and what's really wrong with it.

First, always work on a copy of the original, and I usually work on a copy of the background layer. I often use either smart sharpen or Unsharp Mask filter first, using 0.1 pixel and a big radius, something like 100 (play with the slider). That does fine sharpening. Then I go back and use Unsharp mask with a small radius - like 10-15 and a big pixel number like 50. That adds contrast sharpening. Using the two sharpening passes, which do two different things, you can usually avoid the over-sharpening halos you often see.

Another way is to use the high pass filter (I don't have directions printed out and off-hand can't remember all the steps needed - I don't use it much).

Recently I've been using Topaz Lab's Detail program - its a plug-in for Photoshop. I rather like it, though like any sharpening tool, it doesn't improve every picture.
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