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Old May 16, 2010, 6:35 PM   #1
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Default Real Estate Photography

First, I am a Realtor - but a photographer (probably advanced amatuer) for decades. People in the office love the pictures I take and strongly suggesting I branch out establishing a photography business. It's tempting.

Would appreciate feedback what you think of these, any suggestions would be appreciated. Next week will work on the classic front exterior pic, weather permitting.

Posting multiple in the event you see patterns I need to be aware of.

1. If possible, I love to take birds-eye view of kitchens. While I didn't have my step ladder, this one accomodated with stairs, and took from 3rd step.


2. This one OK, but had to do excessive perspective adjustment and cut out the outside kitchen to the left of the pool. May retake.


3. Don't know on this. Keep as is with window over-exposure obscuring outside, or retake with window exposure showing golf course (like you see in the mirror) and multiple off-camera flash lighting the room?


4. This one was tricky staying out of that mirror


5.


6. Could benefit by fill flash. Another shot had it to the right, but created a major shaddow on the left of the ceiling.


7.

Last edited by tizeye; May 17, 2010 at 5:45 AM.
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Old May 16, 2010, 7:20 PM   #2
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I'm impressed! The interior shos typically have tough lighting situatons where trying to balance the interior exposure with light coming in from an outside window compete for the attention of the light meter.

As for suggestions, I typically shoot interior images with a slight shift of the white balance to the warmer side. If you are using a flash, try using the Flash WB setting. Or you can always warm it up in post processing. For real estatesales purposes, it would create that inviting glow..the kind that is featured in homes shown in Southern Living magazine!! If you dont mind, I've done a quick edit as an example.

What lens were you using for the interior shots? Looking at the EXIF you were shooting with a wide angled lens.

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Old May 16, 2010, 7:29 PM   #3
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All shots were with D90 and a Sigma 10-20. Most in the 10-14 range.

I am working on flash lighting but let's just say gaining experience with multi off camera bounce/fill. Didn't really like some of the shots I took with flash, and most of these are available light.
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Old May 16, 2010, 8:29 PM   #4
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Your first pick Exif reads: 1/6", f4.2, ISO 200. Are you using a tripod?
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Old May 16, 2010, 8:30 PM   #5
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#3 is a curious shot. The windows are blown out except the reflection in the mirror is ok as well as the reflection on the glass of the picture on the left. On my monitor I prefer the original posting for #1. The alteration by jelpee looks too contrasty and really unnatural.
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Old May 16, 2010, 9:05 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ordo View Post
Your first pick Exif reads: 1/6", f4.2, ISO 200. Are you using a tripod?
On that one it was more of an impromptu monopod as I was up on a step and collapsed the tripod.
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Old May 16, 2010, 9:41 PM   #7
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A good tripod seems mandatory here. EV bracketing can help a lot to chose the best DOF. If i' were a buyer i would like the whole scene in focus. And perfectly leveled.
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Old May 16, 2010, 10:11 PM   #8
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This is when i would adore to have a PC/TS lens, it could do wonders.

Really nice set.

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Old May 17, 2010, 8:10 AM   #9
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Excellent, It's the sort of shots one expects to see when viewing real estate
and of course the decor inside and out here, is of high caliber.

HDR and over dramatizing would not give a client an accurate account so
as to visit the property and hopefully purchase.. I would say keep doing
what you're doing if real estate photography is your vogue. If you can
establish a business from it and get a clientèle then best of luck to you..

Last edited by musket; May 17, 2010 at 8:33 AM.
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Old May 17, 2010, 4:09 PM   #10
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I am a Realtor too, and love the shots. Exactly what my goal is in picking up my first SLR in the coming days. (see: http://forums.steves-digicams.com/wh...00-budget.html)

Any helpful advice from one Realtor to another, about what to avoid, wastes of money, or otherwise?

PS - Budget in my thread title does not include a wide lens. Just to clarify.
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